Those who don’t know history ...

Ashley Carruth’s humanities class re-enacts Korematsu v. United States, a landmark Supreme Court case over the internment of Japanese-Americans during World War II on Thursday afternoon at the La Plata County Courthouse. Carruth says the mock trial was to help the students gain a better understanding of the justice system and to teach them about that period in our history. Students seen in the re-enactment are, from left, Animas High School juniors Brianna Peterson, Brittney Smith, Geoy Fisher, Hunter Swenson and Lacey Meek. Brianna is the daughter of Lisa Crombie and Robert Peterson. Brittney is the daughter of Clarence Smith. Geoy is the son of Penny Fisher and George Pappas. Hunter is the son of Harriet and Steve Swenson, and Lacey is the daughter of Sabrina and Greg Meek. Enlarge photo

STEVE LEWIS/Durango Herald

Ashley Carruth’s humanities class re-enacts Korematsu v. United States, a landmark Supreme Court case over the internment of Japanese-Americans during World War II on Thursday afternoon at the La Plata County Courthouse. Carruth says the mock trial was to help the students gain a better understanding of the justice system and to teach them about that period in our history. Students seen in the re-enactment are, from left, Animas High School juniors Brianna Peterson, Brittney Smith, Geoy Fisher, Hunter Swenson and Lacey Meek. Brianna is the daughter of Lisa Crombie and Robert Peterson. Brittney is the daughter of Clarence Smith. Geoy is the son of Penny Fisher and George Pappas. Hunter is the son of Harriet and Steve Swenson, and Lacey is the daughter of Sabrina and Greg Meek.

Animas High School juniors Hunter Swenson, left, and Lacey Meek perform in a mock trial based on Korematsu v. United States, a landmark Supreme Court case over the internment of Japanese-Americans during World War II on Thursday afternoon at the La Plata County Courthouse. Hunter is the son of Harriet and Steve Swenson, and Lacey is the daughter of Sabrina and Greg Meek. The Supreme Court, in 1944, ruled in favor of the United States, holding the need to protect the country from espionage outweighed Fred Korematsu’s individual rights. The decision was voided in 1983 when Korematsu challenged it in a lower federal court in Northern California. However, the decision has never been explicitly overturned. Enlarge photo

STEVE LEWIS/Durango Herald

Animas High School juniors Hunter Swenson, left, and Lacey Meek perform in a mock trial based on Korematsu v. United States, a landmark Supreme Court case over the internment of Japanese-Americans during World War II on Thursday afternoon at the La Plata County Courthouse. Hunter is the son of Harriet and Steve Swenson, and Lacey is the daughter of Sabrina and Greg Meek. The Supreme Court, in 1944, ruled in favor of the United States, holding the need to protect the country from espionage outweighed Fred Korematsu’s individual rights. The decision was voided in 1983 when Korematsu challenged it in a lower federal court in Northern California. However, the decision has never been explicitly overturned.