Nation Briefs

California

Police to reopen investigation into fugitive ex-cop’s firing

BIG BEAR LAKE, Calif. – The hunt in the snowy mountains for a former Los Angeles police officer suspected in three killings continued Saturday as police announced they will reopen the disciplinary proceedings that led to the fugitive’s firing.

Officials will particularly re-examine Christopher Dorner’s allegations that his law-enforcement career was undone by racist colleagues, Los Angeles Police Chief Charlie Beck told KCBS-TV. He also urged Dorner to surrender.

“If he was to give himself up, we’d be happy to hear what he has to say,” Beck said.

Authorities suspect Dorner in a series of attacks in Southern California over the last several days that left three people dead, including a police officer. Authorities say he has vowed revenge against several former LAPD colleagues who he blamed for ending his career.

Washington

Boeing sends 787 on test flight from Seattle

SEATTLE – Boeing sent a 787 up on a test flight Saturday, the first since the new airliner was grounded three weeks ago because of a battery fire.

The aircraft took off from Boeing Field in Seattle and spent nearly 2½ hours flying back and forth over the inland Columbia Plateau. It landed at Boeing Field shortly before 3 p.m. PST. According to flight-tracking website FlightAware, the aircraft flew for 1,131 miles, slightly more than the 919 planned.

The Federal Aviation Administration granted permission for test flights Thursday.

On Jan. 7, a battery on a plane that had recently landed in Boston short-circuited and caught fire. Nine days later, a battery on an All Nippon Airways plane started smoking, forcing an emergency landing in Japan.

Illinois

Report: Midwest firms coupled to high-speed rail

CHICAGO – Hundreds of Midwest manufacturers stand to benefit from a web of high-speed passenger rail routes emerging from Chicago’s rail hub, according to a report released by an environmental policy group that has fought to defend the use of billions in taxpayer money on such projects.

The report released Friday by the Chicago-based Environmental Law & Policy Center found that 460 manufacturers in seven Midwest states are poised to reap new business, along with a dozen more highly visible companies that make rail cars and locomotives.

Critics of the high-speed rail projects set in motion by President Barack Obama in 2009 with the help of $8 billion in stimulus money say they are expensive boondoggles. Opponents and skeptics include members of Congress, governors, policy experts and even some in the rail industry who doubt any of the planned routes will become profitable, especially given the political pressure to keep fares low.

Kansas

Eisenhower staff to launch 3-year World War II exhibit

TOPEKA, Kan. – A new World War II exhibit starting this summer at the Eisenhower Presidential Library and Museum will pay tribute to the millions who fought with hopes of getting young people engaged in the war’s relevance.

The exhibit will rotate artifacts periodically from a collection of 78,000 items to reflect the advancement of U.S. forces during the war, leading to the surrender of Japan and Germany in 1945. Among the items to be displayed will be a Soviet uniform and diary that were obtained with the help of the U.S. State Department.

Associated Press