McLachlan abiding by Marine’s primary role

Marc Sabin’s letter (“McLachlan a Marine who won’t be saluted,” Herald, Feb. 28) shows a wide misunderstanding of what being a U.S. Marine is about.

OK. I, myself, am a U.S. Marine, First Marine Division, First Recon Battalion. I hope Sabin knows what that means. If he needs a refresher: “first in; last out;” also, “swift, silent, deadly.”

I support universal background checks for gun purchases. I oppose indiscriminate ownership of simulated assault rifles with high-capacity magazines (although I don’t think limiting magazines to 10 rounds will deter mass violence). I support the rights of U.S. citizens to arm themselves adequately to protect their homes and families. I am resourced to do just that, and I don’t need a .223 assault rifle for the purpose. If my home is threatened, I wouldn’t be “reaching out and touching” an enemy at a range of 100 to 400 yards. I’d be working in close.

I live by the two codes that govern U.S. Marine conduct in military and civilian life: semper fidelis (always faithful) and semper vigalans (always vigilant).

I openly invite Sabin to tell me I’ve forgotten what the Marine Corps ethos means.

If U.S. Marine Mike McLachan feels that gun-control measures are needed to help protect against mass violence, he is, in fact, abiding by the most important role assigned to Marines: to be guardians:

“If the Army or the Navy

Ever gaze on Heaven’s scenes,

They will find the streets are guarded

By United States Marines.”

Thomas Wright

Aztec

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