It’s time to get a little red about women’s heart disease Putting

Southwest Life

It’s time to get a little red about women’s heart disease Putting

Preventing heart disease

For optimal heart health, eat about two to three cups of fruits and vegetables daily.
Research confirms that animal protein can be high in saturated fat. Choose lean meats, fish or poultry with the skin removed and plant-based protein like soy, nuts and seeds.
Trans-fat can contribute to heart disease and strokes, and saturated fats can damage your heart. Check the labels on processed foods for trans-fat. Use healthy oils such as olive or canola oil when cooking. Eating fatty fish such as salmon twice a week provides heart healthy omega-3 fats to help reduce cholesterol and triglycerides.
Whole grains contain fiber, which helps lower cholesterol levels. Make half your grains whole grains and include a variety of grains when possible.
Added sugar contributes calories but not nutrients to our diets. Dietary guidelines recommend consuming no more than 6 teaspoons for women and 9 teaspoons for men of added sugars/ sweetened foods daily.
Most Americans consume 3,400 mg of sodium per day – more than twice the amount recommended by the American Heart Association. Whether sodium is from pink salt, sea salt, kosher salt or table salt, it all contains sodium. Most sodium is from processed foods.

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