In southeastern Utah, the Procession Panel speaks across time

Southwest Life

In southeastern Utah, the Procession Panel speaks across time

This comprehensive photo of the Procession Panel shows three lines of marchers or pilgrims headed to a circle that probably represents a great kiva during the Basketmaker III period of ancestral Puebloans living in southeastern Utah. The circle or kiva is on the left.
Though the Anasazi or ancestral Puebloans had no wheels, carts or horses, this bighorn sheep seems to be balancing its two front feet on a wheel.
Two large buck deer are a significant part of the panel. One has an atatl spear descending from its belly and five or possibly six toes on its rear foot instead of hooves.
Marchers or pilgrims on their way to a group celebration wave their right hands in a unique rock art panel carved 1,300 years ago. The scratch marks from their hands were probably carved decades or centuries later by other groups to somehow capture or perhaps negate spiritual power from the panel.
To access the panel, which was not discovered until 1990, hikers climb a wash that has eroded rock and Navajo sandstone at the top. Additional rock art is found down canyon from the large Procession Panel.
This detailed image of the Procession Panel shows a ceremonial leader with a crooked-neck wooden cane or staff leading other villagers toward the celebration. The leader has a duck on his head, which is a recurring rock art symbol in southeastern Utah.
This view of the Procession Panel shows another mesa in the distance. The panel is within a large section of southeastern Utah that has been proposed as the Bears Ears National Monument. The Utah Legislature, however, believes the highest and best use for the area is oil and gas development.

In southeastern Utah, the Procession Panel speaks across time

This comprehensive photo of the Procession Panel shows three lines of marchers or pilgrims headed to a circle that probably represents a great kiva during the Basketmaker III period of ancestral Puebloans living in southeastern Utah. The circle or kiva is on the left.
Though the Anasazi or ancestral Puebloans had no wheels, carts or horses, this bighorn sheep seems to be balancing its two front feet on a wheel.
Two large buck deer are a significant part of the panel. One has an atatl spear descending from its belly and five or possibly six toes on its rear foot instead of hooves.
Marchers or pilgrims on their way to a group celebration wave their right hands in a unique rock art panel carved 1,300 years ago. The scratch marks from their hands were probably carved decades or centuries later by other groups to somehow capture or perhaps negate spiritual power from the panel.
To access the panel, which was not discovered until 1990, hikers climb a wash that has eroded rock and Navajo sandstone at the top. Additional rock art is found down canyon from the large Procession Panel.
This detailed image of the Procession Panel shows a ceremonial leader with a crooked-neck wooden cane or staff leading other villagers toward the celebration. The leader has a duck on his head, which is a recurring rock art symbol in southeastern Utah.
This view of the Procession Panel shows another mesa in the distance. The panel is within a large section of southeastern Utah that has been proposed as the Bears Ears National Monument. The Utah Legislature, however, believes the highest and best use for the area is oil and gas development.
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