Spring runoff data suggest ‘red flag’ for Animas River aquatic life

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Spring runoff data suggest ‘red flag’ for Animas River aquatic life

Data show metal concentrations don’t pose short-term risk, but could in the long-term
A Colorado Parks and Wildlife crew of Jim White, an aquatic biologist; Steve McClung, rowing; and Pete Deren, netting the fish, collected five rainbow trout and five brown trout in an effort to monitor heavy minerals in the Animas River after last year’s Gold King Mine spill.
A rainbow trout is released back into the Animas River after a Colorado Parks and Wildlife crew collected 10 trout to test for heavy metals. The fish will be sent to the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment labs in Denver to test tissue for heavy-metal absorption.

Spring runoff data suggest ‘red flag’ for Animas River aquatic life

A Colorado Parks and Wildlife crew of Jim White, an aquatic biologist; Steve McClung, rowing; and Pete Deren, netting the fish, collected five rainbow trout and five brown trout in an effort to monitor heavy minerals in the Animas River after last year’s Gold King Mine spill.
A rainbow trout is released back into the Animas River after a Colorado Parks and Wildlife crew collected 10 trout to test for heavy metals. The fish will be sent to the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment labs in Denver to test tissue for heavy-metal absorption.
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