Touring London’s punk scene, 40 years later

Southwest Life

Touring London’s punk scene, 40 years later

City to mark impact of Sex Pistols, The Clash
The Sex Pistols played the 100 Club on Oxford Street in May 1976 and the venue hosted a punk festival in the fall of ’76. In January 2016, 1970s bands including 999, The Members, UK Subs and Discharge played here as part of a punk series.
Tourists take photos outside the Rough Trade record shop in London. Rough Trade opened in 1976 on Kensington Park Road. Today, it’s on Talbot Road, filled with vinyl and CDs, its walls and ceiling adorned with posters featuring The Clash and Sex Pistols, among others.
A chalkboard shows a listing of gigs at the Hope & Anchor pub in London. The Hope & Anchor has a ground-floor pub with a small theater space upstairs and music venue in the basement. The basement’s roster has included The Jam, The Ramones, The Police, The Stranglers, XTC, U2, The Cure, Joy Division and The Pogues.
With a fabulous neon facade, the Screen on the Green cinema hosts movies and live events. It’s one of the oldest cinemas in the UK. The Clash, Sex Pistols and Buzzcocks played together there on the night Aug. 29, 1976.
The thriving collection of bars, restaurants, shops and stalls in Camden Market is overrun with shoppers perusing all types of food and fashion, from espresso to T-shirts bearing the Union Jack.
Guitars hang from the walls of the NO.TOM guitar shop on Denmark Street in London. The short street, once known as London’s Tin Pan Alley, was home to many music publishers and studios. Behind NO.TOM there’s a tiny 19th-century cottage where the Sex Pistols once lived.

Touring London’s punk scene, 40 years later

The Sex Pistols played the 100 Club on Oxford Street in May 1976 and the venue hosted a punk festival in the fall of ’76. In January 2016, 1970s bands including 999, The Members, UK Subs and Discharge played here as part of a punk series.
Tourists take photos outside the Rough Trade record shop in London. Rough Trade opened in 1976 on Kensington Park Road. Today, it’s on Talbot Road, filled with vinyl and CDs, its walls and ceiling adorned with posters featuring The Clash and Sex Pistols, among others.
A chalkboard shows a listing of gigs at the Hope & Anchor pub in London. The Hope & Anchor has a ground-floor pub with a small theater space upstairs and music venue in the basement. The basement’s roster has included The Jam, The Ramones, The Police, The Stranglers, XTC, U2, The Cure, Joy Division and The Pogues.
With a fabulous neon facade, the Screen on the Green cinema hosts movies and live events. It’s one of the oldest cinemas in the UK. The Clash, Sex Pistols and Buzzcocks played together there on the night Aug. 29, 1976.
The thriving collection of bars, restaurants, shops and stalls in Camden Market is overrun with shoppers perusing all types of food and fashion, from espresso to T-shirts bearing the Union Jack.
Guitars hang from the walls of the NO.TOM guitar shop on Denmark Street in London. The short street, once known as London’s Tin Pan Alley, was home to many music publishers and studios. Behind NO.TOM there’s a tiny 19th-century cottage where the Sex Pistols once lived.
On the Net

www.punk.london

Reader Comments
click here to add your event
Area Events