Pastures of James Ranch to remain undeveloped ‘forever’

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Pastures of James Ranch to remain undeveloped ‘forever’

Family places final conservation easement on James Ranch
The James family, owners of the James Ranch, north of Durango, has placed another parcel of land, the family’s fourth donation, in a conservation easement. The move helps ensure the bulk of the 420-acre ranch remains permanently dedicated to agricultural use.
Kristin Sigurdsen, an apprentice with James Ranch, which runs along the Animas River north of Durango, moves cows and calves on Friday. After placing another parcel of the ranch in a conservation easement, Kay James said, “Now it’s always going to be agricultural land. That’s it.”
Kristin Sigurdsen, an apprentice with the James Ranch, which runs along the Animas River north of Durango, moves cows after milking. The James family has added additional acreage from its ranch into a conservation easement. The easement is a voluntary arrangement that places development restrictions on land in return for tax incentives.
A cow stays close to her 2-day-old calf at James Ranch north of Durango on Friday morning. In the mid-2000s, the James family came to an undivided consensus: The ranchland should never be sold off and developed.

Pastures of James Ranch to remain undeveloped ‘forever’

The James family, owners of the James Ranch, north of Durango, has placed another parcel of land, the family’s fourth donation, in a conservation easement. The move helps ensure the bulk of the 420-acre ranch remains permanently dedicated to agricultural use.
Kristin Sigurdsen, an apprentice with James Ranch, which runs along the Animas River north of Durango, moves cows and calves on Friday. After placing another parcel of the ranch in a conservation easement, Kay James said, “Now it’s always going to be agricultural land. That’s it.”
Kristin Sigurdsen, an apprentice with the James Ranch, which runs along the Animas River north of Durango, moves cows after milking. The James family has added additional acreage from its ranch into a conservation easement. The easement is a voluntary arrangement that places development restrictions on land in return for tax incentives.
A cow stays close to her 2-day-old calf at James Ranch north of Durango on Friday morning. In the mid-2000s, the James family came to an undivided consensus: The ranchland should never be sold off and developed.
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