Coal Gulch Fire 75 percent contained as of Sunday night

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Coal Gulch Fire 75 percent contained as of Sunday night

Showers, low wind offer favorable conditions to those battling the blaze
Derek Harbour, with the Idaho Panhandle crew; Scott Nielsen, Durango Fire Protection District incident commander; and Randy Black, DFPD deputy chief, seen from left, discuss the Coal Gulch Fire that broke out Saturday afternoon in the Perins Peak State Wildlife Area. Fortunately the rough and rocky Coal Gulch Road served as a natural barrier against the fire, they said.
JESSICA PACE/Durango Herald

The Perins Peak State Wildlife Area was engulfed in smoke Saturday night. With help from showers and low winds, crews were able to get the Coal Gulch Fire 75 percent contained by Sunday night.
JESSICA PACE/Durango Herald

A Skidgine was deployed to combat the Coal Gulch Fire. It’s a regionally dispatched piece of equipment that can hold 1,250 gallons of water, and it has a blade to hack through rough terrain.
Helicopters pull water from a nearby pond to help douse Coal Gulch Fire, which was reported Saturday afternoon. The cause of the fire is unconfirmed, but a neighbor said he heard a loud crack of lightning just before the fire started.
Firefighters attack the Coal Gulch Fire from the air Saturday afternoon. More air attacks were made Sunday.

Coal Gulch Fire 75 percent contained as of Sunday night

Derek Harbour, with the Idaho Panhandle crew; Scott Nielsen, Durango Fire Protection District incident commander; and Randy Black, DFPD deputy chief, seen from left, discuss the Coal Gulch Fire that broke out Saturday afternoon in the Perins Peak State Wildlife Area. Fortunately the rough and rocky Coal Gulch Road served as a natural barrier against the fire, they said.
JESSICA PACE/Durango Herald

The Perins Peak State Wildlife Area was engulfed in smoke Saturday night. With help from showers and low winds, crews were able to get the Coal Gulch Fire 75 percent contained by Sunday night.
JESSICA PACE/Durango Herald

A Skidgine was deployed to combat the Coal Gulch Fire. It’s a regionally dispatched piece of equipment that can hold 1,250 gallons of water, and it has a blade to hack through rough terrain.
Helicopters pull water from a nearby pond to help douse Coal Gulch Fire, which was reported Saturday afternoon. The cause of the fire is unconfirmed, but a neighbor said he heard a loud crack of lightning just before the fire started.
Firefighters attack the Coal Gulch Fire from the air Saturday afternoon. More air attacks were made Sunday.
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