Love stories at Tres Piedras: Aldo Leopold’s cabin in New Mexico

Southwest Life

Love stories at Tres Piedras: Aldo Leopold’s cabin in New Mexico

Married in 1912, Aldo Leopold and Estella Bergere had a long, happy marriage that included five children, three of whom were elected to the prestigious National Academy of Science.
Outfitted with pistol and pipe, Aldo Leopold poses near one of the granite outcroppings on the Carson National Forest near Tres Piedras, New Mexico.
When he was the second supervisor on the Carson National Forest, Aldo Leopold built this bungalow in 1912 for himself and his young bride though he only lived in it for less than a year. Restored in 2006, the bungalow is now home to the Aldo & Estella Leopold Writers-in-Residency Program.
Aldo and Estella Leopold married in October of 1912 at the cathedral in Santa Fe. He became a world famous conservationist and ecologist, and she became one of the top female archers in the Midwest.
Aldo Leopold’s cabin at Tres Piedras was restored in 2006.
The Leopold family loved to observe nature, hunt, sing songs in Spanish and play guitar. Here, Estella and her son Starker shoot game near Santa Fe.
Just west of Aldo Leopold’s house are ponderosa pines, granite outcrops and boulders. In July, 29 species of birds were identified in the area in two days.
Born into one of the wealthiest and most politically connected of all Hispanic New Mexican families, Estella Leopold sits for a family portrait. She is standing at the top left. Her uncle Solomon Luna helped write the New Mexican state constitution which is in Spanish and English.
The back porch of Also Leopold’s house in Tres Piedras at the base of granite outcroppings.
An original Denver & Rio Grande Railroad wooden water tank stands today at Tres Piedras, New Mexico. Leopold often rode the mountain train and called it “slower’n a burro and just as sorry.”
Aldo Leopold painted this watercolor of the house he built and designed at Tres Piedras, New Mexico. It is now the site of the Aldo & Estella Leopold Writers-in-Residency.
Aldo Leopold married Estella Luna Otero Bergere whose family’s extensive land holdings included the Luna Mansion in Las Lunas, New Mexico, built with money from the Santa Fe Railroad after the railroad purchased a right-of-way across her grandfather’s vast estate.
Just west of Aldo Leopold’s house is a forested area of ponderosa pines, granite outcrops and boulders where in July, 29 species of birds were identified in two days.
The distinctive granite outcropping, which rises above ponderosa pines in Taos County on the Carson National Forest, is named Tres Piedras, and it has numerous climbing routes.
A standard forest ranger cabin on the Carson National Forest from the first decades of the 20th century moved adjacent to and south of Aldo Leopold’s bungalow.
A stone root cellar was built to keep food items cool just west of the back porch of Aldo Leopold’s bungalow in New Mexico.

Love stories at Tres Piedras: Aldo Leopold’s cabin in New Mexico

Married in 1912, Aldo Leopold and Estella Bergere had a long, happy marriage that included five children, three of whom were elected to the prestigious National Academy of Science.
Outfitted with pistol and pipe, Aldo Leopold poses near one of the granite outcroppings on the Carson National Forest near Tres Piedras, New Mexico.
When he was the second supervisor on the Carson National Forest, Aldo Leopold built this bungalow in 1912 for himself and his young bride though he only lived in it for less than a year. Restored in 2006, the bungalow is now home to the Aldo & Estella Leopold Writers-in-Residency Program.
Aldo and Estella Leopold married in October of 1912 at the cathedral in Santa Fe. He became a world famous conservationist and ecologist, and she became one of the top female archers in the Midwest.
Aldo Leopold’s cabin at Tres Piedras was restored in 2006.
The Leopold family loved to observe nature, hunt, sing songs in Spanish and play guitar. Here, Estella and her son Starker shoot game near Santa Fe.
Just west of Aldo Leopold’s house are ponderosa pines, granite outcrops and boulders. In July, 29 species of birds were identified in the area in two days.
Born into one of the wealthiest and most politically connected of all Hispanic New Mexican families, Estella Leopold sits for a family portrait. She is standing at the top left. Her uncle Solomon Luna helped write the New Mexican state constitution which is in Spanish and English.
The back porch of Also Leopold’s house in Tres Piedras at the base of granite outcroppings.
An original Denver & Rio Grande Railroad wooden water tank stands today at Tres Piedras, New Mexico. Leopold often rode the mountain train and called it “slower’n a burro and just as sorry.”
Aldo Leopold painted this watercolor of the house he built and designed at Tres Piedras, New Mexico. It is now the site of the Aldo & Estella Leopold Writers-in-Residency.
Aldo Leopold married Estella Luna Otero Bergere whose family’s extensive land holdings included the Luna Mansion in Las Lunas, New Mexico, built with money from the Santa Fe Railroad after the railroad purchased a right-of-way across her grandfather’s vast estate.
Just west of Aldo Leopold’s house is a forested area of ponderosa pines, granite outcrops and boulders where in July, 29 species of birds were identified in two days.
The distinctive granite outcropping, which rises above ponderosa pines in Taos County on the Carson National Forest, is named Tres Piedras, and it has numerous climbing routes.
A standard forest ranger cabin on the Carson National Forest from the first decades of the 20th century moved adjacent to and south of Aldo Leopold’s bungalow.
A stone root cellar was built to keep food items cool just west of the back porch of Aldo Leopold’s bungalow in New Mexico.
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