Researchers find abundant life in Hawaii’s twilight zone

Researchers find abundant life in Hawaii’s twilight zone

Fish swim in a mesophotic coral ecosystem about 230 feet deep in the in channel off Maui, Hawaii. Coral reefs in Hawaii’s oceanic twilight zone, the deep area of ocean where light still penetrates and photosynthesis occurs, are abundant and home to a wide variety of regionally unique fish species. A new paper says that some of the reefs off the archipelago are the most extensive deep-water reef ecosystem ever recorded.
Fish swim in a mesophotic coral ecosystem near Kure Atoll, the northernmost reef in the Hawaiian archipelago. Coral reefs in Hawaii’s oceanic twilight zone, the deep area of ocean where light still penetrates and photosynthesis occurs, are abundant and home to a wide variety of regionally unique fish species.

Researchers find abundant life in Hawaii’s twilight zone

Fish swim in a mesophotic coral ecosystem about 230 feet deep in the in channel off Maui, Hawaii. Coral reefs in Hawaii’s oceanic twilight zone, the deep area of ocean where light still penetrates and photosynthesis occurs, are abundant and home to a wide variety of regionally unique fish species. A new paper says that some of the reefs off the archipelago are the most extensive deep-water reef ecosystem ever recorded.
Fish swim in a mesophotic coral ecosystem near Kure Atoll, the northernmost reef in the Hawaiian archipelago. Coral reefs in Hawaii’s oceanic twilight zone, the deep area of ocean where light still penetrates and photosynthesis occurs, are abundant and home to a wide variety of regionally unique fish species.
Reader Comments
click here to add your event
Area Events