Singing Cowboy’s museum expands, adds Native American art

Arts & Entertainment

Singing Cowboy’s museum expands, adds Native American art

A statue of Gene Autry at the entrance to the Autry Museum of the American West in Los Angeles. Autry knew the American West was much more than the ridin’, ropin’ and singin’ he enthralled audiences with. It was a point he strived to drive home when he opened the museum in 1988.
A visitor views a display of a buckskin dress in the style of one work by Mabel McKay at the Autry Museum of the American West in Los Angeles. “The Life and Work of Mabel McKay,” a Pomo Indian basket weaver, healer, civil-rights activist and person believed to be the last speaker of her tribal language when she died in 1993. Her intricately woven, often colorful baskets, ranging from the size of a pinhead to some large enough to serve as laundry containers, are accompanied by a recreation of her workroom, narration by her son and other works are part of the opening Sunday.
An interactive display of pottery and other artifacts made by Native people from across California is on display the Autry Museum of the American West in Los Angeles. An expansion to the site, opening Sunday, includes a garden of native Western flora, as well as new galleries showcasing hundreds of Native American works, some from present day, others centuries old, many never seen publicly.

Singing Cowboy’s museum expands, adds Native American art

A statue of Gene Autry at the entrance to the Autry Museum of the American West in Los Angeles. Autry knew the American West was much more than the ridin’, ropin’ and singin’ he enthralled audiences with. It was a point he strived to drive home when he opened the museum in 1988.
A visitor views a display of a buckskin dress in the style of one work by Mabel McKay at the Autry Museum of the American West in Los Angeles. “The Life and Work of Mabel McKay,” a Pomo Indian basket weaver, healer, civil-rights activist and person believed to be the last speaker of her tribal language when she died in 1993. Her intricately woven, often colorful baskets, ranging from the size of a pinhead to some large enough to serve as laundry containers, are accompanied by a recreation of her workroom, narration by her son and other works are part of the opening Sunday.
An interactive display of pottery and other artifacts made by Native people from across California is on display the Autry Museum of the American West in Los Angeles. An expansion to the site, opening Sunday, includes a garden of native Western flora, as well as new galleries showcasing hundreds of Native American works, some from present day, others centuries old, many never seen publicly.
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