Bridge to Nowhere’s sinking ramps need a face lift

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Bridge to Nowhere’s sinking ramps need a face lift

Settlement has resulted in 6- to 8-inch drops
At least one diver found use for the north end of the U.S. Highway 160 interchange, the so-called “Bridge to Nowhere.” The project is suffering from settling problems and work to repair issues will begin Monday.
A steel plate on the expansion joint on the north end of the U.S. Highway 160 interchange, widely known as the Bridge to Nowhere, shows some of the settling issues.
Wilson Gulch Road will eventually connect to the roundabout at the north end of the U.S. Highway 160 interchange, located near Farmington Hill.
The so called Bridge to Nowhere – going over U.S. Highway 160 in Grandview, east of Durango during construction in 2009 – earned its popular moniker because it failed to link any existing roads.

Bridge to Nowhere’s sinking ramps need a face lift

At least one diver found use for the north end of the U.S. Highway 160 interchange, the so-called “Bridge to Nowhere.” The project is suffering from settling problems and work to repair issues will begin Monday.
A steel plate on the expansion joint on the north end of the U.S. Highway 160 interchange, widely known as the Bridge to Nowhere, shows some of the settling issues.
Wilson Gulch Road will eventually connect to the roundabout at the north end of the U.S. Highway 160 interchange, located near Farmington Hill.
The so called Bridge to Nowhere – going over U.S. Highway 160 in Grandview, east of Durango during construction in 2009 – earned its popular moniker because it failed to link any existing roads.
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