Outsider drums way into hearts of Tierra Amarilla residents

Southwest Life

Outsider drums way into hearts of Tierra Amarilla residents

A derelict grocery store in Tierra Amarilla, N.M., features political graffiti from the late 1960s and the uprising of the Land Grant Alliance, which sought to return historic land grant acreage to local families.
Outside of Tierra Amarilla, N.M., a highway billboard proclaims “Tierra o Muerte” or “Land or Death.” Since this photo was taken someone has shot an arrow between the eyes of the revolutionary figure who represents Emiliano Zapata.
Three Ravens Coffee House owner and master drum maker Paul Namkung poses at the entrance to his building which was once a post office, bar, rooming house and Catholic school.
Residents and visitors alike sit on the handmade chairs and small coffee tables on the historic porch to drink their coffees, teas, and smoothies. Owner Paul Namkung says he named his coffee house Three Ravens because heís always loved the birds and they have a good sense of humor
Economic decline in Tierra Amarilla, N.M., the county seat of Rio Arriba County, is epitomized by Lito’s Ballroom, which once was a center for area nightlife.
Over almost a decade, adobe restoration specialist Jim Giesen has repaired damaged walls the old way with mud and straw which allows historic buildings to breath. Mid-20th century applications of cement stucco did huge damage to 19th century adobe buildings across the Southwest including the Martinez Mercantile store.

Outsider drums way into hearts of Tierra Amarilla residents

A derelict grocery store in Tierra Amarilla, N.M., features political graffiti from the late 1960s and the uprising of the Land Grant Alliance, which sought to return historic land grant acreage to local families.
Outside of Tierra Amarilla, N.M., a highway billboard proclaims “Tierra o Muerte” or “Land or Death.” Since this photo was taken someone has shot an arrow between the eyes of the revolutionary figure who represents Emiliano Zapata.
Three Ravens Coffee House owner and master drum maker Paul Namkung poses at the entrance to his building which was once a post office, bar, rooming house and Catholic school.
Residents and visitors alike sit on the handmade chairs and small coffee tables on the historic porch to drink their coffees, teas, and smoothies. Owner Paul Namkung says he named his coffee house Three Ravens because heís always loved the birds and they have a good sense of humor
Economic decline in Tierra Amarilla, N.M., the county seat of Rio Arriba County, is epitomized by Lito’s Ballroom, which once was a center for area nightlife.
Over almost a decade, adobe restoration specialist Jim Giesen has repaired damaged walls the old way with mud and straw which allows historic buildings to breath. Mid-20th century applications of cement stucco did huge damage to 19th century adobe buildings across the Southwest including the Martinez Mercantile store.
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