Colorado bill protects people who forcibly enter vehicle to rescue people, animals

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Colorado bill protects people who forcibly enter vehicle to rescue people, animals

Measure outlines what constitutes an emergency
What to look for

An important aspect of House Bill 1179, which would protect citizens who forcibly enter vehicles to administer aid, is recognizing the need for aid.
Troy Salazar, emergency medical service coordinator for Pueblo Community College, said one initial sign that a person is experiencing an environmental emergency is altered behavior.
“If they are confused, if they are not answering things appropriately, if they are mumbling their words anything like that,” Salazar said. For young children who are not able to properly articulate what they are experiencing this could manifest as agitation.
In the case of hypothermia, extensive shivering is expected during the early stages but as it progresses the body loses its ability to compensate and stops sending blood to the extremities as it tries to preserve the core organs.
“You might get to a point where they lose a radial pulse,” Salazar said.
For heat exposure, cramping of the legs and abdomen, flushed skin and sweating might be observed but as the body loses its ability to cool itself, sweating may stop.
If these symptoms are observed, the most important thing to do is contact 911 and remove the individual from the environment that is affecting them, Salazar said. This could include removing excess clothing in the summer or wet clothing in the winter.
“That environment might be what they are wearing,” he said.

Colorado bill protects people who forcibly enter vehicle to rescue people, animals

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