A cool way to shred

A cool way to shred

Paperboard recycling gaining speed in Durango
Jennifer Dezarn of Phoenix Data Protection feeds paperboard into a shredder on Tuesday afternoon at Native Roots Garden Center.
Tim Wheeler of Durango Coffee Co. talks about the process of recycling paperboard into compost on Tuesday afternoon at Native Roots Garden Center. Wheeler said the paperboard is first shredded, then mixed with coffee grounds, plant material and kitchen scraps inside a compost bin. There, it is eaten by earthworms.
A handful of compost material reveals worms at work under the surface at Native Roots Garden Center.
Recycling increasing in Durango for No. 5 plastic

The recycling of No. 5 plastic tubs which, like paperboard, have no market close by, is going great, Joshua Jackson, general manager of Durango Natural Foods, said Tuesday.
Durango Natural Foods, a cooperative, is the only place in La Plata County that accepts No. 5 plastic.
“The recycling has grown significantly,” Jackson said. “We collected maybe 15 pounds a week when we began in August 2009. Now we’re receiving 60 to 70 pounds a week.”
No. 5 plastic (polypropylene) is used to manufacture household goods (plates or bowls) and personal-care items (toothbrushes).
No. 5 refers to the number in the triangular recycling symbol on tubs containing butter, cottage cheese and yogurt.
Consumers who drop off No. 5 plastic pay a nickel per container to help defray the expense of shipping the tubs to Preserve Products in Cortland, N.Y. Preserve pays the freight for bulk suppliers such as Whole Foods Market.
Clean, dry tubs can be left with the Durango Natural Foods cashier, who records the transaction by punching a particular key on the cash register.
Members of the cooperative don’t pay.
Some businesses are starting to bring in plastic or help pay the cost of shipping, Jackson said.
“We’re receiving so many tubs we don’t count anymore,” Jackson said.
daler@durangoherald.com

A cool way to shred

Jennifer Dezarn of Phoenix Data Protection feeds paperboard into a shredder on Tuesday afternoon at Native Roots Garden Center.
Tim Wheeler of Durango Coffee Co. talks about the process of recycling paperboard into compost on Tuesday afternoon at Native Roots Garden Center. Wheeler said the paperboard is first shredded, then mixed with coffee grounds, plant material and kitchen scraps inside a compost bin. There, it is eaten by earthworms.
A handful of compost material reveals worms at work under the surface at Native Roots Garden Center.
Reader Comments
click here to add your event
Area Events
click here to add your event
Area Events