The script flips: Cursive makes a comeback

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The script flips: Cursive makes a comeback

This handwriting skill has benefits beyond penmanship
A third-grader practices his cursive handwriting at P.S. 166 in the Queens borough of New York. Last fall, the 1.1 million-student New York City schools encouraged the teaching of cursive to students as young as the third grade.
Students display their cursive writing work and exercises at P.S. 166 in the Queens borough of New York. After a generation of students who know only keyboarding, texting and printing out their words longhand, cursive writing is making a comeback.
Christine Weltner watches one of her students practice his cursive handwriting at P.S. 166 in the Queens borough of New York.
A third-grader practices his cursive handwriting at P.S.166 in the Queens borough of New York.
A sample of cursive letters are on display in the third-grade classroom at P.S. 166 in the Queens borough of New York. Schools Chancellor Carmen Farina distributed a handbook about teaching cursive writing in September and is encouraging principals to use it.
A third-grader practices his cursive handwriting at P.S. 166 in the Queens borough of New York. Research suggests fluent cursive helps students master writing tasks such as spelling and sentence construction because they don’t have to think as much about forming letters.
Christine Weltner helps one of her third-grade students as he practices his cursive handwriting at P.S.166 in the Queens borough of New York.

The script flips: Cursive makes a comeback

A third-grader practices his cursive handwriting at P.S. 166 in the Queens borough of New York. Last fall, the 1.1 million-student New York City schools encouraged the teaching of cursive to students as young as the third grade.
Students display their cursive writing work and exercises at P.S. 166 in the Queens borough of New York. After a generation of students who know only keyboarding, texting and printing out their words longhand, cursive writing is making a comeback.
Christine Weltner watches one of her students practice his cursive handwriting at P.S. 166 in the Queens borough of New York.
A third-grader practices his cursive handwriting at P.S.166 in the Queens borough of New York.
A sample of cursive letters are on display in the third-grade classroom at P.S. 166 in the Queens borough of New York. Schools Chancellor Carmen Farina distributed a handbook about teaching cursive writing in September and is encouraging principals to use it.
A third-grader practices his cursive handwriting at P.S. 166 in the Queens borough of New York. Research suggests fluent cursive helps students master writing tasks such as spelling and sentence construction because they don’t have to think as much about forming letters.
Christine Weltner helps one of her third-grade students as he practices his cursive handwriting at P.S.166 in the Queens borough of New York.
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