No major species dieoffs from Animas River contamination a cause for optimism

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No major species dieoffs from Animas River contamination a cause for optimism

No major species dieoffs from Animas River contamination a cause for optimism

Scott Roberts, aquatic biologist with Mountain Studies Institute, collects insects from the Animas River to check their health Sunday morning near Rotary Park.

The institute had been keeping an eye on the insects just before and Wednesday morning’s accidental release of toxic minerals from the Gold King Mine, and it has kept up the study after the accident. So far, Roberts says the bugs are doing all right. But he said only time will tell.
Nasty muck collects on the bottom of the Animas River near Rotary Park on Sunday.
Baetis, cased caddis, net-spinning caddis, black flies and midges are just a few of the insects that Scott Roberts, an aquatic biologist with the Mountain Studies Institute, is keeping an eye on in the Animas River near Rotary Park on Sunday.
Baetis, cased caddis, net-spinning caddis, black flies, and midges, are just a few of the insects Mountain Studies Institute aquatic biologist Scott Roberts is keeping an eye on in the Animas River near Rotary Park on Sunday.
Scott Roberts, aquatic biologist with Mountain Studies Institute, collects insects Sunday morning from the Animas River near Rotary Park to check on their health. The institute has been keeping an eye on insects just before and after the accidental release of toxic minerals from the Gold King Mine So far according to Roberts the bugs are doing all right, but time will tell, he said.
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