Colorado leaders bridge the divide

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Colorado leaders bridge the divide

‘Collaboration’ the word for Sens. Gardner, Bennet
Andy Corra, center, owner of 4 Corners Riversports in Durango, talks with Colorado U.S. Senators Michael Bennet, right, and Cory Gardner, left, on a bridge over the Animas River in Durango. The politicians were getting a first-hand look of the damage to the river after the Gold King Mine spill of about three million gallons of toxic waste into the water on Aug. 5, 2015.
Sen. Cory Gardner, R-Colorado, left, and Sen. Michael Bennet, D-Colorado.
Sen. Cory Gardner, R-Colorado, center, gestures as he walks with Sen. Michael Bennet, D-Colorado, second from right, and Steve Beedy, right, a board member of the Colorado Wheat Administrative Committee, during a June 2015 tour of the Colorado Highlands Wind farm, in Fleming, northeastern Colorado. The two senators spent the day together, also visiting with wheat farmers.
Sen. Cory Gardner, R-Colorado, left, and Sen. Michael Bennet, D-Colorado, second from left, listen to Southern Ute Tribal Council Chairman Clement Frost, second from right, and Ute Mountain Ute councilwoman Priscilla Blackhawk-Rentz in 2015 at Lake Nighthorse.
The breakdown

In the current Congress, Colorado, Florida, Indiana, Missouri, Montana, North Dakota, Nevada, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin and West Virginia have one senator from each major party. In the 114th Congress, all those states plus Illinois and New Hampshire had one senator from each major party.
In both Congresses, Vermont and Maine had one senator in the Independent party and one senator who is a Democrat or Republican. Vermont and Maine were not included in this article’s count of states with senators from different parties because partisanship in the Senate primarily occurs between Democrats and Republicans.
There have been changes in the senators in some of these states from the 114th Congress to the 115th Congress. Indiana and Nevada each had one senator who retired after the 114th Congress, and those two senators were replaced by politicians from the same party.
Illinois and New Hampshire each had a Republican senator who was ousted by a Democrat for the 115th Congress, which meant that those two states no longer had two senators from different political parties.

Colorado leaders bridge the divide

Andy Corra, center, owner of 4 Corners Riversports in Durango, talks with Colorado U.S. Senators Michael Bennet, right, and Cory Gardner, left, on a bridge over the Animas River in Durango. The politicians were getting a first-hand look of the damage to the river after the Gold King Mine spill of about three million gallons of toxic waste into the water on Aug. 5, 2015.
Sen. Cory Gardner, R-Colorado, left, and Sen. Michael Bennet, D-Colorado.
Sen. Cory Gardner, R-Colorado, center, gestures as he walks with Sen. Michael Bennet, D-Colorado, second from right, and Steve Beedy, right, a board member of the Colorado Wheat Administrative Committee, during a June 2015 tour of the Colorado Highlands Wind farm, in Fleming, northeastern Colorado. The two senators spent the day together, also visiting with wheat farmers.
Sen. Cory Gardner, R-Colorado, left, and Sen. Michael Bennet, D-Colorado, second from left, listen to Southern Ute Tribal Council Chairman Clement Frost, second from right, and Ute Mountain Ute councilwoman Priscilla Blackhawk-Rentz in 2015 at Lake Nighthorse.
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