Putting Everett Ruess to rest: Perhaps a final conclusion to a 1934 desert mystery

Southwest Life

Putting Everett Ruess to rest: Perhaps a final conclusion to a 1934 desert mystery

Everett Ruess in Tsegi Canyon in July 1934 with archaeologist Clay Locket helping to pull a burro up the steep stone trail. Photo from the Rainbow Bridge/Monument Valley Ansel Hall Collection. Used by permission of Fort Lewis College, Center of Southwest Studies.
Everett Ruess in Long House, Wetherill Mesa, Mesa Verde National Park, 1932. Courtesy of Steven R. Jerman, © The Estate of Everett Ruess. Used by permission EverettRuess.net.
Linoleum block print by Everett Ruess “Square Tower House, Mesa Verde.” © The Estate of Everett Ruess. Used by permission and reproductions available at EverettRuess.net. Courtesy of Steven R. Jerman
Block print self-portrait of Everett Ruess on the trail with two burros which was his 1933 Christmas card © The Estate of Everett Ruess. Used by permission and reproductions available at EverettRuess.net. Courtesy of Steven R. Jerman.
Like many others who have searched for Everett Ruess, the author has camped in Davis Gulch. Canyon reflections in late afternoon showcase the seduction of light on sandstone cliffs that captivated the young artist. Courtesy of Andrew Gulliford
Photo of the 1934 Rainbow Bridge Expedition Archaeological crew. Everett Ruess is on the far left in the black cowboy hat. Photo courtesy of Gil Mull.
Like many others who have searched for Everett Ruess, the author has camped in Davis Gulch. Canyon reflections in late afternoon showcase the seduction of light on sandstone cliffs that captivated the young artist. Courtesy of Andrew Gulliford
Like many others who have searched for Everett Ruess, the author has camped in Davis Gulch. Canyon reflections in late afternoon showcase the seduction of light on sandstone cliffs that captivated the young artist. Courtesy of Andrew Gulliford
Everett Ruess covered much of the territory duplicated by the Rainbow Bridge Monument Valley Expedition in 1933-1934. Map courtesy of Gil Mull.

Putting Everett Ruess to rest: Perhaps a final conclusion to a 1934 desert mystery

Everett Ruess in Tsegi Canyon in July 1934 with archaeologist Clay Locket helping to pull a burro up the steep stone trail. Photo from the Rainbow Bridge/Monument Valley Ansel Hall Collection. Used by permission of Fort Lewis College, Center of Southwest Studies.
Everett Ruess in Long House, Wetherill Mesa, Mesa Verde National Park, 1932. Courtesy of Steven R. Jerman, © The Estate of Everett Ruess. Used by permission EverettRuess.net.
Linoleum block print by Everett Ruess “Square Tower House, Mesa Verde.” © The Estate of Everett Ruess. Used by permission and reproductions available at EverettRuess.net. Courtesy of Steven R. Jerman
Block print self-portrait of Everett Ruess on the trail with two burros which was his 1933 Christmas card © The Estate of Everett Ruess. Used by permission and reproductions available at EverettRuess.net. Courtesy of Steven R. Jerman.
Like many others who have searched for Everett Ruess, the author has camped in Davis Gulch. Canyon reflections in late afternoon showcase the seduction of light on sandstone cliffs that captivated the young artist. Courtesy of Andrew Gulliford
Photo of the 1934 Rainbow Bridge Expedition Archaeological crew. Everett Ruess is on the far left in the black cowboy hat. Photo courtesy of Gil Mull.
Like many others who have searched for Everett Ruess, the author has camped in Davis Gulch. Canyon reflections in late afternoon showcase the seduction of light on sandstone cliffs that captivated the young artist. Courtesy of Andrew Gulliford
Like many others who have searched for Everett Ruess, the author has camped in Davis Gulch. Canyon reflections in late afternoon showcase the seduction of light on sandstone cliffs that captivated the young artist. Courtesy of Andrew Gulliford
Everett Ruess covered much of the territory duplicated by the Rainbow Bridge Monument Valley Expedition in 1933-1934. Map courtesy of Gil Mull.
Reader Comments