Red spiral marks day of solstice at Fort Lewis College

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Red spiral marks day of solstice at Fort Lewis College

Hazy skies a result of New Mexico wildfire
About 50 people showed up early Wednesday morning to view the summer solstice spiral that appears high on a wall in the museum of the Center of Southwest Studies building at Fort Lewis College as the sun rises. This year the spiral appeared red for the first time since 2002 because of smoke in the atmosphere from New Mexico wildfires.
As the earth rotates the summer solstice spiral projected through a window changes shape early Wednesday on a wall in the museum of the Center of Southwest Studies building at Fort Lewis College. This year a smoky haze from New Mexico wildfires caused the spiral to appear red for the first time since 2002. Usually the spiral is bright white.
A window in the Center of Southwest Studies building at Fort Lewis College has a spiral built into the window thats casts the shape of the spiral on a wall in the museum during the summer solstice, which occurred this year on Wednesday morning at sunrise. The spiral is at its most defined for about 30 minutes beginning at 6:11 a.m. on the solstice, said Curator Jeannie Brako.
About 50 people showed up for the early Wednesday morning to view the summer solstice spiral, and waited patiently as clouds and a smoky haze delayed its appearance. The spiral appeared at 6:28 a.m. – a few minutes later than usual – and viewers were treated to a rare red tinge to the spiral because of smoke in the atmosphere.
About 50 people showed up early Wednesday to view the summer solstice spiral high up on a wall in the museum of the Center of Southwest Studies building at Fort Lewis College. This year the spiral appeared red for the first time since 2002 thanks to smoke in the atmosphere from wildfires.

Red spiral marks day of solstice at Fort Lewis College

About 50 people showed up early Wednesday morning to view the summer solstice spiral that appears high on a wall in the museum of the Center of Southwest Studies building at Fort Lewis College as the sun rises. This year the spiral appeared red for the first time since 2002 because of smoke in the atmosphere from New Mexico wildfires.
As the earth rotates the summer solstice spiral projected through a window changes shape early Wednesday on a wall in the museum of the Center of Southwest Studies building at Fort Lewis College. This year a smoky haze from New Mexico wildfires caused the spiral to appear red for the first time since 2002. Usually the spiral is bright white.
A window in the Center of Southwest Studies building at Fort Lewis College has a spiral built into the window thats casts the shape of the spiral on a wall in the museum during the summer solstice, which occurred this year on Wednesday morning at sunrise. The spiral is at its most defined for about 30 minutes beginning at 6:11 a.m. on the solstice, said Curator Jeannie Brako.
About 50 people showed up for the early Wednesday morning to view the summer solstice spiral, and waited patiently as clouds and a smoky haze delayed its appearance. The spiral appeared at 6:28 a.m. – a few minutes later than usual – and viewers were treated to a rare red tinge to the spiral because of smoke in the atmosphere.
About 50 people showed up early Wednesday to view the summer solstice spiral high up on a wall in the museum of the Center of Southwest Studies building at Fort Lewis College. This year the spiral appeared red for the first time since 2002 thanks to smoke in the atmosphere from wildfires.
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