2011 agenda will tax Tipton

News

2011 agenda will tax Tipton

Spending, debt dilemma will challenge Republican in keeping campaign promises
Scott Tipton, here speaking to constituents in 2008, is one of 63 Republican freshmen in Congress.
Tipton
Tipton a political veteran despite limited time in office

Scott Tipton was just 19 years old when he got his first taste of politics as a delegate for Ronald Reagan to the Republican National Convention in 1976.
Despite a lifetime of involvement in politics, the new Republican congressman from Cortez never held public office until two years ago.
After graduating from Fort Lewis College, Tipton worked for the successful Reagan campaigns in 1980 and 1984. He has served as head of the Montezuma County Republican Party. And he was chairman of the Republican committee for the 3rd Congressional District when he decided to run against Rep. John Salazar, D-Manassa, in 2006.
After losing that race, Tipton put politics aside, but only briefly.
Rep. Ray Rose, R-Montrose, convinced Tipton to run for Rose’s seat in the state House. In 2008 he won the Montrose-centered district handily over the town’s former mayor.
In the Legislature, Tipton voted with the most conservative wing of the Republican Party, according to legislative “report cards” from both liberal and conservative groups.
He served on the House Education Committee and House Agriculture, Livestock and Natural Resources Committee.
Tipton sponsored few bills in the state House.
His highest profile bill was “Katie’s Law” in 2009, a successful bipartisan effort to start a DNA database of people who are arrested for major crimes. It is named after a New Mexico murder victim whose killer had been arrested but wasn’t linked through DNA to all his crimes.
Tipton and his co-sponsors had to overcome opposition from civil libertarians in both parties to pass the law.
Two other bills made minor changes to the law, allowing easier applications for water rights and letting sheriffs designate someone other than a deputy to inspect vehicle identification numbers. Tipton also sponsored bills to upgrade a judge in Montrose County to full-time, and to increase the salaries of future Montezuma County elected officials.
During the campaign, Tipton said legislators need to show restraint and not pass a lot of legislation.
“If the number of bills is a scorecard on how hard you’re working, I would disagree with that. Let’s ask any Coloradan, does the state need 1,000 new laws every two years?” Tipton said.
In 2009, Tipton briefly considered running for state Senate, but he stepped aside in favor of Rep. Ellen Roberts, R-Durango, who won the seat. Soon after, he announced a rematch against Salazar in the 2010 election.
jhanel@durango herald.com

2011 agenda will tax Tipton

Scott Tipton, here speaking to constituents in 2008, is one of 63 Republican freshmen in Congress.
Tipton
Reader Comments
click here to add your event
Area Events