Seeking stability in FLC tuition waiver

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Seeking stability in FLC tuition waiver

Federal funding is about fairness, longevity
Michelle Alvarez, a Navajo, graduated from Fort Lewis College in April. The opportunity to take advantage of the tuition waiver at Fort Lewis College was a huge factor in her deciding to attend Fort Lewis College, Alvarez said. State and college officials are fighting to put the waiver on more stable financial ground by shifting some of the waiver’s $13 million cost to the federal government.
Since she started as president at Fort Lewis College, Dene Kay Thomas has worked diligently to create and promote legislation that would require the federal government to pay for some of the tuition waiver’s $13 million cost.
Sharilyn Browning studies for a final examination in an introduction to Native American and Indigenous Studies class at Fort Lewis College. One in five students at the college are Native American, drawn to the college because of a tuition waiver offered to any member of the nation’s 565 registered tribes.
IN THIS SERIES

SUNDAY: The tuition waiver’s history, regional economic impact and symbolic importance.
MONDAY: Past use of Fort Lewis College’s former campus and its effect on the tuition waiver.
TODAY: Legislators and college officials hope to shift some

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Past campus presents new possibilities for FLC
Waiver has had to survive rocky history

Fort Lewis College has good reason to be proactive about protecting the tuition waiver from state legislators skeptical of the $13 million annual price tag.
Legislators first tried to diminish the scope of the tuition waiver in 1971. The

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Seeking stability in FLC tuition waiver

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Michelle Alvarez, a Navajo, graduated from Fort Lewis College in April. The opportunity to take advantage of the tuition waiver at Fort Lewis College was a huge factor in her deciding to attend Fort Lewis College, Alvarez said. State and college officials are fighting to put the waiver on more stable financial ground by shifting some of the waiver’s $13 million cost to the federal government.
Purchase
Since she started as president at Fort Lewis College, Dene Kay Thomas has worked diligently to create and promote legislation that would require the federal government to pay for some of the tuition waiver’s $13 million cost.
Sharilyn Browning studies for a final examination in an introduction to Native American and Indigenous Studies class at Fort Lewis College. One in five students at the college are Native American, drawn to the college because of a tuition waiver offered to any member of the nation’s 565 registered tribes.
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