Researchers study impact of medicinal plant’s harvest in San Juan National Forest

News

Researchers study impact of medicinal plant’s harvest in San Juan National Forest

Regi Black Elk, left, a student at Haskell Indian Nations University, and Courtney Masterson, a student at the University of Kansas, plant flags to mark immature, mature and flowering osha plants in a research plot on Missionary Ridge.
A tiny osha sprout grows from roots left over from earlier harvest in a research plot on Missionary Ridge.
Daniel Gagnon, left, owner of Herbs Etc. in Santa Fe, and Maggie Riggs, a volunteer from Lawrence, Kansas, monitor the results of a three-year study on Missionary Ridge to determine the impacts of harvest on osha regeneration.
Amy Isenberg of the University of Kansas prepares to flag a mature osha plant in a plot on Missionary Ridge as part of a research project to gather data on the native species’ ability to regenerate after harvest.
Daniel Gagnon, left, owner of Herbs Etc. in Santa Fe, and Maggie Riggs, a volunteer from Lawrence, Kansas, prepare to plant flags to mark the levels of osha regeneration in study plots on Missionary Ridge.
A smiling Susan Leopold of United Plant Savers helps the University of Kansas research crew monitor the rates of regeneration of osha in plots established on Missionary Ridge.
Osha, a native plant known for its medicinal properties, is the subject of a three-year study on its ability to regenerate after harvest pressure.

Researchers study impact of medicinal plant’s harvest in San Juan National Forest

Regi Black Elk, left, a student at Haskell Indian Nations University, and Courtney Masterson, a student at the University of Kansas, plant flags to mark immature, mature and flowering osha plants in a research plot on Missionary Ridge.
A tiny osha sprout grows from roots left over from earlier harvest in a research plot on Missionary Ridge.
Daniel Gagnon, left, owner of Herbs Etc. in Santa Fe, and Maggie Riggs, a volunteer from Lawrence, Kansas, monitor the results of a three-year study on Missionary Ridge to determine the impacts of harvest on osha regeneration.
Amy Isenberg of the University of Kansas prepares to flag a mature osha plant in a plot on Missionary Ridge as part of a research project to gather data on the native species’ ability to regenerate after harvest.
Daniel Gagnon, left, owner of Herbs Etc. in Santa Fe, and Maggie Riggs, a volunteer from Lawrence, Kansas, prepare to plant flags to mark the levels of osha regeneration in study plots on Missionary Ridge.
A smiling Susan Leopold of United Plant Savers helps the University of Kansas research crew monitor the rates of regeneration of osha in plots established on Missionary Ridge.
Osha, a native plant known for its medicinal properties, is the subject of a three-year study on its ability to regenerate after harvest pressure.
Reader Comments
click here to add your event
Durango ~ Events
click here to add your event
Durango ~ Events