Houston’s businesses inching back to work as waters recede

Houston’s businesses inching back to work as waters recede

Bobby Jucker, owner of Three Brothers Bakery, cleans up storm damage Sept. 2 at his bakery in Houston. In 2008, Hurricane Ike tore the roof off his business. Now he estimates he’s facing $1 million in damage and lost revenue from Hurricane Harvey, the fifth time a storm has put his bakery out commission.
Bobby Jucker, owner of Three Brothers Bakery, cleans up the storm damage at his bakery Sept. 2 in Houston. In 2008, Hurricane Ike tore the roof off his business. Now he estimates he’s facing $1 million in damage and lost revenue from Hurricane Harvey, the fifth time a storm has put his bakery out commission. A week after Harvey dropped four feet of rain on Houston, America’s fourth-biggest city is struggling to reopen for business.
Maria Tran, co-owners of Chic Tailors, near Brays Bayou in Meyerland, Texas, prepares to open her business with her 3-year-old son, Ander on Sept. 2. Tran wants to get the shop open quickly so her sister can take over while she gives birth to her second child, a daughter. She worries because she watched customers move away after previous floods. But for now she says she has “no complaints. Compared with other people, we’re lucky we’re still here and alive.”

Houston’s businesses inching back to work as waters recede

Bobby Jucker, owner of Three Brothers Bakery, cleans up storm damage Sept. 2 at his bakery in Houston. In 2008, Hurricane Ike tore the roof off his business. Now he estimates he’s facing $1 million in damage and lost revenue from Hurricane Harvey, the fifth time a storm has put his bakery out commission.
Bobby Jucker, owner of Three Brothers Bakery, cleans up the storm damage at his bakery Sept. 2 in Houston. In 2008, Hurricane Ike tore the roof off his business. Now he estimates he’s facing $1 million in damage and lost revenue from Hurricane Harvey, the fifth time a storm has put his bakery out commission. A week after Harvey dropped four feet of rain on Houston, America’s fourth-biggest city is struggling to reopen for business.
Maria Tran, co-owners of Chic Tailors, near Brays Bayou in Meyerland, Texas, prepares to open her business with her 3-year-old son, Ander on Sept. 2. Tran wants to get the shop open quickly so her sister can take over while she gives birth to her second child, a daughter. She worries because she watched customers move away after previous floods. But for now she says she has “no complaints. Compared with other people, we’re lucky we’re still here and alive.”
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