Literally lousy: Parasite plagues world salmon industry

News

Literally lousy: Parasite plagues world salmon industry

This undated photo provided by Cooke Aquaculture shows a sea louse with an extruding attached. The tiny lice attach themselves to salmon and feed on them, killing or rendering them unsuitable for dinner tables.
This undated photo provided by Cooke Aquaculture shows a sea louse in its early stages. The lice can grow to be about the size of a pea and lay thousands of eggs in their brief lifetime.
An Atlantic salmon leaps in a Cooke Aquaculture farm pen near Eastport, Maine. A surge of parasitic sea lice is disrupting salmon farms around the world, infesting salmon farms in the U.S., Canada, Scotland, Norway and Chile.
Atlantic salmon brood stock circle a tank at Oak Bay Fish Hatchery on July 13 in Oak Haven, New Brunswick. Scientists are working to defeat sea lice using numerous methods, including breeding for genetic resistance.
Robert F. Bukaty/Associated Press file

An Atlantic salmon jumps in a Cooke Aquaculture farm cage near Blacks Harbour, New Brunswick, Canada. A surge of parasitic sea lice is disrupting salmon farms around the world, infesting salmon farms in the U.S., Canada, Scotland, Norway and Chile.
Robert F. Bukaty/Associated Press file

Workers position their boats at a Cooke Aquaculture salmon farm near Blacks Harbour, New Brunswick, Canada. A surge of parasitic sea lice is disrupting salmon farms around the world, infesting salmon farms in the U.S., Canada, Scotland, Norway and Chile.
Robert F. Bukaty/Associated Press file

Workers gather Atlantic salmon before putting them into a tank aboard a ship for a treatment with hydrogen peroxide at a Cooke Aquaculture salmon farm near Blacks Harbour, New Brunswick., Canada. Salmon have a lousy problem, and a race to solve is spanning the globe.
Robert F. Bukaty/Associated Press file

Workers confer aboard a warm water lice removal vessel on Beaver Harbour in New Brunswick, Canada. The barge contains a series of tubes that send about 300 salmon a minute on a winding journey while dousing them with warm water to remove lice. The “waterslide park for fish” is one of the innovations being tested in the salmon farming industry’s war against sea lice.

Literally lousy: Parasite plagues world salmon industry

This undated photo provided by Cooke Aquaculture shows a sea louse with an extruding attached. The tiny lice attach themselves to salmon and feed on them, killing or rendering them unsuitable for dinner tables.
This undated photo provided by Cooke Aquaculture shows a sea louse in its early stages. The lice can grow to be about the size of a pea and lay thousands of eggs in their brief lifetime.
An Atlantic salmon leaps in a Cooke Aquaculture farm pen near Eastport, Maine. A surge of parasitic sea lice is disrupting salmon farms around the world, infesting salmon farms in the U.S., Canada, Scotland, Norway and Chile.
Atlantic salmon brood stock circle a tank at Oak Bay Fish Hatchery on July 13 in Oak Haven, New Brunswick. Scientists are working to defeat sea lice using numerous methods, including breeding for genetic resistance.
Robert F. Bukaty/Associated Press file

An Atlantic salmon jumps in a Cooke Aquaculture farm cage near Blacks Harbour, New Brunswick, Canada. A surge of parasitic sea lice is disrupting salmon farms around the world, infesting salmon farms in the U.S., Canada, Scotland, Norway and Chile.
Robert F. Bukaty/Associated Press file

Workers position their boats at a Cooke Aquaculture salmon farm near Blacks Harbour, New Brunswick, Canada. A surge of parasitic sea lice is disrupting salmon farms around the world, infesting salmon farms in the U.S., Canada, Scotland, Norway and Chile.
Robert F. Bukaty/Associated Press file

Workers gather Atlantic salmon before putting them into a tank aboard a ship for a treatment with hydrogen peroxide at a Cooke Aquaculture salmon farm near Blacks Harbour, New Brunswick., Canada. Salmon have a lousy problem, and a race to solve is spanning the globe.
Robert F. Bukaty/Associated Press file

Workers confer aboard a warm water lice removal vessel on Beaver Harbour in New Brunswick, Canada. The barge contains a series of tubes that send about 300 salmon a minute on a winding journey while dousing them with warm water to remove lice. The “waterslide park for fish” is one of the innovations being tested in the salmon farming industry’s war against sea lice.
click here to add your event
Durango ~ Events
click here to add your event
Durango ~ Events