Fort Lewis College’s new hall to mix high-tech labs and beauty

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Fort Lewis College’s new hall to mix high-tech labs and beauty

Everything a budding scientist could want
Raising the money

The Fort Lewis College Foundation committed to raising $4.2 million for the new Geosciences, Physics and Engineering Hall. According to Mark Jastorff, vice president for advancement, the college has raised half, with $1.4 million cash on hand, and a total of $2.1 million including pledges.
Most of the donations have come in large chunks – $900,000 from the FLC Foundation, $200,000 from La Plata Electric Association, $90,000 from alumnus and $288,000, from the Roy Dalpra Trust, a donation just announced.
“Dalpra has also given about $400,000 in scholarship funding since the late 1980s,” FLC spokesman Mitch Davis said, “but we don’t know much about him. He also supported San Juan College and was in the oil and gas industry, but that’s about it.”
To learn more about contributing and naming opportunities, contact Sarah Grace, director of campaign, at sgpretzer@fortlewis.edu or 247-7658.

Fort Lewis College’s new hall to mix high-tech labs and beauty

The new Fort Lewis College Geosciences, Physics and Engineering Hall, which is scheduled to open in late fall 2016, has a rooftop area for a domed observatory with telescope. The telescope was purchased with a grant from the Air Force to track space junk and provide community outreach in teaching astronomy.
Neil Dolder, job superintendent with Jaynes Corp. for the Fort Lewis College Geosciences, Physics and Engineering Hall, shows the construction plans on a big screen TV. Construction workers use technology to look at the building blueprints on a tablet while on site.
A rendering of the $35-million Fort Lewis College Geosciences, Physics and Engineering Hall, which is scheduled to open late fall 2016. The building triples the amount of the space for the three disciplines, the fastest growing at the college, and will contain smart classrooms, numerous labs and an observatory.
The Department of Geosciences plans to install three large slabs of Brazilian rock in the hallways in its wing in the new Geosciences, Physics and Engineering Hall at Fort Lewis College. The stone was formed in a magma cave 10 to 20 kilometers below the surface of the Earth and shows minerals interlacing with each other. The darker sections are garnet.
The Department of Geosciences plans to install three large slabs of Brazilian rock in the hallways in its wing in the new Geosciences, Physics and Engineering Hall at Fort Lewis College. The stone was formed in a magma cave 10 to 20 kilometers below the surface of the Earth and shows minerals interlacing with each other. In this closeup of the slab, it's easier to see the darker sections, which are garnet.
This rendering of the new Geosciences, Physics and Engineering Hall at Fort Lewis College shows the front plaza while facing west. The entryway will include a two-story rock timeline on the geology of this area as well as, in the ceiling, light-emitting diodes of constellations important to the Native American tribes who call the Southwest home.
This rendering of the northeast corner of the new Geosciences, Physics and Engineering Hall at Fort Lewis College shows the Geosciences Wing, which will house both teaching and research labs.
The engineering wing of the new Geosciences, Physics and Engineering Hall at Fort Lewis College connects to the rooftop observatory in the rear in this rendering of the building. The observatory's telescope is courtesy of a grant from the Air Force and will be used to track space junk, educate FLC students and bring in K-12 students and community members to learn about astronomy.
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