Cider-makers forage for old wild apple flavor

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Cider-makers forage for old wild apple flavor

David Dolginow, co-founder of Shacksbury Cider, picks up wild apples Oct. 3 in Rochester, Vt. As the craft cider industry continues its resurgence with not enough commercial cider apples available, some cider makers are foraging for wild apples that have links to the country’s early cider making history.
Colin Davis, co-founder of Shacksbury Cider, samples hard cider at the company’s tasting room in Vergennes, Vt. Shacksbury Cider harvests wild apples from mountain roadsides, old farmsteads and pastures and the backyards of homes through its Lost Apple Project. It produces specialty hard ciders from the harvests and propagates its own trees from some of the best wild ones.
David Dolginow, left, co-founder of Shacksbury Cider, and colleague Michael Lee harvest wild apples in Rochester, Vt., for the company’s specialty ciders.

Cider-makers forage for old wild apple flavor

David Dolginow, co-founder of Shacksbury Cider, picks up wild apples Oct. 3 in Rochester, Vt. As the craft cider industry continues its resurgence with not enough commercial cider apples available, some cider makers are foraging for wild apples that have links to the country’s early cider making history.
Colin Davis, co-founder of Shacksbury Cider, samples hard cider at the company’s tasting room in Vergennes, Vt. Shacksbury Cider harvests wild apples from mountain roadsides, old farmsteads and pastures and the backyards of homes through its Lost Apple Project. It produces specialty hard ciders from the harvests and propagates its own trees from some of the best wild ones.
David Dolginow, left, co-founder of Shacksbury Cider, and colleague Michael Lee harvest wild apples in Rochester, Vt., for the company’s specialty ciders.
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