Closing the gap

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Closing the gap

STEM program aims to give girls a boost in science, math fields
STEM Power: Women in Science drew dozens of girls who came to hear women with careers in science talk about their experiences May 21 at the Powerhouse Science Center. The women came prepared with fun trivia and ways their jobs impact the girls’ lives. Lori Moore, an engineer with Russell Planning and Engineering, who works a lot on municipal infrastructure problems, asked, “Do you ever wonder where the water goes when you flush the toilet?”
Girls attending STEM Power: Women in Science on May 21 at the Powerhouse Science Center had the opportunity to take part in numerous scientific experiments, including one that demonstrated the effects of static electricity. Anya Snyder, 10, daughter of Matthew and Lisa Snyder, impresses the crowd with her flyaway hair. Girls also measured skulls and bones at Dawn Mulhern’s anthropology table and learned about the structure of buildings with architect Rachel Olson.
Robin Schichtel, 9, daughter of Rob and Beth Schichtel, waits her turn to query the women in attendance at STEM Power: Women in Science on May 21 at the Powerhouse Science Center. Forester and Geographic Information Systems specialist Lindsay Gartner said she had never served as a role model for young girls before, and it was not only important, it was also fun.
Courtesy of Women's Foundation of Colorado

The results of the Colorado Department of Education's standardized tests in four subject areas separated by gender show that while girls' results in science and math are consistently lower than boys', they are not as widely separated as seen in boys' and girls' performances on ACT tests.
Courtesy of Women's Foundation of Colorado

The results of the ACT tests from 2012 showing college preparedness in science and math show girls are significantly less prepared than boys, and girls in Colorado are below the national average in mathematical preparedness as well.

Closing the gap

STEM Power: Women in Science drew dozens of girls who came to hear women with careers in science talk about their experiences May 21 at the Powerhouse Science Center. The women came prepared with fun trivia and ways their jobs impact the girls’ lives. Lori Moore, an engineer with Russell Planning and Engineering, who works a lot on municipal infrastructure problems, asked, “Do you ever wonder where the water goes when you flush the toilet?”
Girls attending STEM Power: Women in Science on May 21 at the Powerhouse Science Center had the opportunity to take part in numerous scientific experiments, including one that demonstrated the effects of static electricity. Anya Snyder, 10, daughter of Matthew and Lisa Snyder, impresses the crowd with her flyaway hair. Girls also measured skulls and bones at Dawn Mulhern’s anthropology table and learned about the structure of buildings with architect Rachel Olson.
Robin Schichtel, 9, daughter of Rob and Beth Schichtel, waits her turn to query the women in attendance at STEM Power: Women in Science on May 21 at the Powerhouse Science Center. Forester and Geographic Information Systems specialist Lindsay Gartner said she had never served as a role model for young girls before, and it was not only important, it was also fun.
Courtesy of Women's Foundation of Colorado

The results of the Colorado Department of Education's standardized tests in four subject areas separated by gender show that while girls' results in science and math are consistently lower than boys', they are not as widely separated as seen in boys' and girls' performances on ACT tests.
Courtesy of Women's Foundation of Colorado

The results of the ACT tests from 2012 showing college preparedness in science and math show girls are significantly less prepared than boys, and girls in Colorado are below the national average in mathematical preparedness as well.
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