Fort Lewis College professor uses robots to go where no man has gone before

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Fort Lewis College professor uses robots to go where no man has gone before

Ryan N. Smith wins 2017-18 Fort Lewis College Featured Scholar award
Ryan N. Smith, assistant professor of physics and engineering at Fort Lewis College, sets functions on the robot Sawyer, an industrial robot used for manufacturing, at the college. Smith is the winner of the 2017-18 Fort Lewis College Featured Scholar award for his work to monitor water quality across the region.
Ryan N. Smith, assistant professor of physics and engineering at Fort Lewis College, controls robot Baxter with his movements. Smith specializes in control theory and path planning for autonomous underwater vehicles.
Ryan N. Smith, left, and FLC engineering student Jordan Brenner prepare to launch an autonomous surface vehicle at Lake Nighthorse on Thursday to test its programing. Smith uses robots to gather data in dangerous and toxic environments where it is extremely difficult for humans to explore.
Ryan N. Smith, right, and FLC engineering student Jordan Brenner prepare to launch an autonomous underwater vehicle at Lake Nighthorse on Thursday. Brenner signed a contract with the college after graduation to work on robotic development at the robotic GNOME laboratory on campus.

Fort Lewis College professor uses robots to go where no man has gone before

Ryan N. Smith, assistant professor of physics and engineering at Fort Lewis College, sets functions on the robot Sawyer, an industrial robot used for manufacturing, at the college. Smith is the winner of the 2017-18 Fort Lewis College Featured Scholar award for his work to monitor water quality across the region.
Ryan N. Smith, assistant professor of physics and engineering at Fort Lewis College, controls robot Baxter with his movements. Smith specializes in control theory and path planning for autonomous underwater vehicles.
Ryan N. Smith, left, and FLC engineering student Jordan Brenner prepare to launch an autonomous surface vehicle at Lake Nighthorse on Thursday to test its programing. Smith uses robots to gather data in dangerous and toxic environments where it is extremely difficult for humans to explore.
Ryan N. Smith, right, and FLC engineering student Jordan Brenner prepare to launch an autonomous underwater vehicle at Lake Nighthorse on Thursday. Brenner signed a contract with the college after graduation to work on robotic development at the robotic GNOME laboratory on campus.
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