Durango’s Studio & Gallery to open ‘Still/Unstill’ exhibit

Img ?1512216803

CLOSE TO HOME: RESPONDING TO SEXUAL ASSAULT IN OUR COMMUNITY

Arts & Entertainment

Durango’s Studio & Gallery to open ‘Still/Unstill’ exhibit

Studio & artist, owner Maureen May curates new show
Steven Subotnick’s artist statement for Studio & Gallery’s newest show, “Still/Unstill”: “My work uses varied imagery – from cartoon to pure textural abstraction, unusual editing techniques and carefully structured sound design to make human vulnerability, conflict and history concrete and to convey a deeply personal aesthetic experience to viewers. I approach my filmmaking as a form of animated inquiry similar in intent to poetry and essay writing. The structure of my work is concentrated and condensed. I use intuition, associative thinking, metaphor and the poetry of color, mark-making and texture as my primary tools. For me, animation is a form of active and reflective engagement that transforms thought and emotion into images and sounds. My films have explored non-objective imagery, stories with unusual characters and animation based on actual historical events. While covering a wide territory of content, I have worked to create my own ‘language’ of animation forms.” “Still/Unstill” will open today (Friday).
Jeff Wise’s artist statement for Studio &’s “Still/Unstill”: “My sculpture is rooted in balance, with great respect for materials and their inherent textures. I try to elude the grasp of gravity, allowing rocks to fly and metal to flow like water. I interpret visual gestures found in nature and astronomy, such as swirling galaxies and the rhythmic movement of birds and fish.”
From Kelsey Ward’s artist statement for “Still/Unstill”: “This particular animation was made to show what it is like to create art with depression. People tend to idealize the ‘tortured artist,’ that when we are at our lowest we create our best. Yes, the pieces we create can be beautiful, but to the artist (or at the very least myself), the piece holds those emotions.”





When we look at the work after it is done, all we can see are those low points. The audience may appreciate what has been created, but we only see the pain that inspired it.”
Courtesy of David Holub

From DGO editor David Holub’s artist statement: “I like playing with context. When Trump speaks in context, he often sounds like a buffoon or a madman or an overly confident simpleton. Taken out of context – though still his words verbatim – then put in the voice of a young child, Trump suddenly ... makes perfect sense. A certain kind of humor also relies on context – or lack thereof. Sometimes, knowing little about the who/what/where/when/why of a premise amps the absurdity, whimsicality or irony. Ultimately, there’s no right way to pick up a sleeping hitchhiker.”
“In the Utah desert, a sand hill had several perfect little circles etched in the sand. Closer inspection showed tiny pieces of grass that were blowing in the wind creating circles. This is the impetus for (the sculpture) ‘Inscription.’ It reflects the magic of the invisible forming tangible marks in the world,” says Sandra Butler in her artist statement for “Still/Unstill.”
From Stacey Sotosky’s artist statement for “Still/Unstill”: “We each change over the course of time. Throughout life, we grow in many ways. However, we are contained by our ONE existence, ONE chance; confusing and unsteady at times but synchronized and harmonious at others. Our essence continues on, hopeful that if we just keep going, magical, blissful, joyful moments will happen in our time ahead. Shadow Study analyzes 2D performance space and postproduction methods that play with time and chance. My process was inspired by the work of Merce Cunningham’s Chance Method, which opens time-based art to the possibility of serendipitous occurrence.”
Courtesy of Stacey Sotosky
Courtesy of Stacey Sotosky
Courtesy of Stacey Sotosky
May
If you go

What: Still/Unstill, curated by Maureen May
When: Opening reception 5-9 p.m. today (Friday), featuring a performance by 20Moons Dance Theatre. Show will run through Nov. 29
Where: Studio & Gallery, 1027 Main Ave.
More information: Visit https://www.anddurango.com

Durango’s Studio & Gallery to open ‘Still/Unstill’ exhibit

Steven Subotnick’s artist statement for Studio & Gallery’s newest show, “Still/Unstill”: “My work uses varied imagery – from cartoon to pure textural abstraction, unusual editing techniques and carefully structured sound design to make human vulnerability, conflict and history concrete and to convey a deeply personal aesthetic experience to viewers. I approach my filmmaking as a form of animated inquiry similar in intent to poetry and essay writing. The structure of my work is concentrated and condensed. I use intuition, associative thinking, metaphor and the poetry of color, mark-making and texture as my primary tools. For me, animation is a form of active and reflective engagement that transforms thought and emotion into images and sounds. My films have explored non-objective imagery, stories with unusual characters and animation based on actual historical events. While covering a wide territory of content, I have worked to create my own ‘language’ of animation forms.” “Still/Unstill” will open today (Friday).
Jeff Wise’s artist statement for Studio &’s “Still/Unstill”: “My sculpture is rooted in balance, with great respect for materials and their inherent textures. I try to elude the grasp of gravity, allowing rocks to fly and metal to flow like water. I interpret visual gestures found in nature and astronomy, such as swirling galaxies and the rhythmic movement of birds and fish.”
From Kelsey Ward’s artist statement for “Still/Unstill”: “This particular animation was made to show what it is like to create art with depression. People tend to idealize the ‘tortured artist,’ that when we are at our lowest we create our best. Yes, the pieces we create can be beautiful, but to the artist (or at the very least myself), the piece holds those emotions.”





When we look at the work after it is done, all we can see are those low points. The audience may appreciate what has been created, but we only see the pain that inspired it.”
Courtesy of David Holub

From DGO editor David Holub’s artist statement: “I like playing with context. When Trump speaks in context, he often sounds like a buffoon or a madman or an overly confident simpleton. Taken out of context – though still his words verbatim – then put in the voice of a young child, Trump suddenly ... makes perfect sense. A certain kind of humor also relies on context – or lack thereof. Sometimes, knowing little about the who/what/where/when/why of a premise amps the absurdity, whimsicality or irony. Ultimately, there’s no right way to pick up a sleeping hitchhiker.”
“In the Utah desert, a sand hill had several perfect little circles etched in the sand. Closer inspection showed tiny pieces of grass that were blowing in the wind creating circles. This is the impetus for (the sculpture) ‘Inscription.’ It reflects the magic of the invisible forming tangible marks in the world,” says Sandra Butler in her artist statement for “Still/Unstill.”
From Stacey Sotosky’s artist statement for “Still/Unstill”: “We each change over the course of time. Throughout life, we grow in many ways. However, we are contained by our ONE existence, ONE chance; confusing and unsteady at times but synchronized and harmonious at others. Our essence continues on, hopeful that if we just keep going, magical, blissful, joyful moments will happen in our time ahead. Shadow Study analyzes 2D performance space and postproduction methods that play with time and chance. My process was inspired by the work of Merce Cunningham’s Chance Method, which opens time-based art to the possibility of serendipitous occurrence.”
Courtesy of Stacey Sotosky
Courtesy of Stacey Sotosky
Courtesy of Stacey Sotosky
May
Reader Comments
click here to add your event
Durango ~ Events
click here to add your event
Durango ~ Events