Long Hollow Dam extends growing season in dry region of La Plata County

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Long Hollow Dam extends growing season in dry region of La Plata County

Brice Lee, La Plata Water Conservancy District board president, walks on Long Hollow Dam south of Redmesa. The reservoir allowed Colorado to meet its water obligations to New Mexico this year, while allowing ranchers and farmers in southwestern La Plata County to access enough water to extend the growing season by about two weeks. “We’re pretty pleased,” Lee says. “We had a good year.”
Water released from Long Hollow Dam south of Redmesa eventually flows into the La Plata River to fulfill Colorado’s water obligations to New Mexico.
Dead trees indicate the high water level at Long Hollow Dam south of Redmesa. Right now, the reservoir is holding 1,100 acre-feet of water. It has a capacity of nearly 5,400 acre-feet.
Mineral-covered stones mark the high water level at Long Hollow Dam south of Redmesa. Right now, the reservoir is holding 1,100 acre-feet of water. It has a capacity of nearly 5,400 acre-feet.
Water released from Long Hollow Dam south of Redmesa eventually flows into the La Plata River to fulfill Colorado’s water obligations to New Mexico.
Brice Lee, left, La Plata Water Conservancy District board president, and Ron Crawford, Long Hollow Dam tender, talk about the dam south of Redmesa. “This is helping families that were drying up and getting discouraged,” said Crawford, a fourth generation La Plata County resident.
Mineral-covered stones mark the high water level at Long Hollow Dam south of Redmesa.
In 2014, Jennifer Burbey looks out from the top of Long Hollow Dam after its dedication.

Long Hollow Dam extends growing season in dry region of La Plata County

Brice Lee, La Plata Water Conservancy District board president, walks on Long Hollow Dam south of Redmesa. The reservoir allowed Colorado to meet its water obligations to New Mexico this year, while allowing ranchers and farmers in southwestern La Plata County to access enough water to extend the growing season by about two weeks. “We’re pretty pleased,” Lee says. “We had a good year.”
Water released from Long Hollow Dam south of Redmesa eventually flows into the La Plata River to fulfill Colorado’s water obligations to New Mexico.
Dead trees indicate the high water level at Long Hollow Dam south of Redmesa. Right now, the reservoir is holding 1,100 acre-feet of water. It has a capacity of nearly 5,400 acre-feet.
Mineral-covered stones mark the high water level at Long Hollow Dam south of Redmesa. Right now, the reservoir is holding 1,100 acre-feet of water. It has a capacity of nearly 5,400 acre-feet.
Water released from Long Hollow Dam south of Redmesa eventually flows into the La Plata River to fulfill Colorado’s water obligations to New Mexico.
Brice Lee, left, La Plata Water Conservancy District board president, and Ron Crawford, Long Hollow Dam tender, talk about the dam south of Redmesa. “This is helping families that were drying up and getting discouraged,” said Crawford, a fourth generation La Plata County resident.
Mineral-covered stones mark the high water level at Long Hollow Dam south of Redmesa.
In 2014, Jennifer Burbey looks out from the top of Long Hollow Dam after its dedication.
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