‘Take all their excuses away’: Hard cases in heroin fight

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‘Take all their excuses away’: Hard cases in heroin fight

More than 64,000 died of drug overdoses last year in the U.S., most from opioids
Richard Rivera lies in his Saint Anthony Hospital bed a few days after arriving sick from heroin withdrawal in Chicago. His public health insurance would cover three days in the hospital’s new medical detox unit. Hours later, just moments from going to a sober-living facility, Rivera complained of chest pains that took him away from the watchful eye of the medical detox staff.
Albert Nunley walks to a methadone clinic after his three days with addiction counselors at the Saint Anthony Hospital medical detox unit in Chicago. Nunley had goals, small ones: “I done took my first step. Now I want to stay focused on doing the things I got to do. Going to AA meetings and things like that.”
Albert Nunley takes his methadone dose at the Saint Anthony Hospital medical detox unit in Chicago. Nunley told a counselor he’d been using heroin for nearly 40 years. With a friend recently dying of an overdose, his doctor telling him to quit, and feeling guilty around his grandchildren, Nunley says he is highly motivated to quit. “I don’t want to die from drugs,” he told the counselor.
Addiction counselor DeValle Williams listens to a conversation on opioid addiction at the nurses station at Saint Anthony Hospital in Chicago. Long before President Donald Trump declared the opioid crisis a national public health emergency, Williams and his team were fighting in the trenches where it’s tough to tell victory from defeat on any given day.
Albert Nunley responds to questions from Robert Anderson, an addiction counselor at the Saint Anthony Hospital medical detox unit in Chicago. Nunley told Anderson he’d been using heroin for nearly 40 years. The fentanyl now lacing the heroin on the streets was scaring him. With a friend recently dying of an overdose, his doctor telling him to quit, and feeling guilty around his grandchildren, Nunley says he is highly motivated to quit. “I don’t want to die from drugs,” he told Anderson.
Richard Rivera, still in his Saint Anthony Hospital gown, pleads with Robert Anderson, a member of the medical detox team, to get him into a sober-living facility near his family in Chicago. Hours later, just moments from going to a facility, Rivera complained of chest pains that took him away from the watchful eye of the medical detox staff.
Richard Rivera, still in his Saint Anthony Hospital gown, pleads with a member of the medical detox team to get him into a sober-living facility near his family in Chicago. His public health insurance would cover three days in the hospital’s new medical detox unit. Hours later, just moments from going to a facility, Rivera complained of chest pains that took him away from the watchful eye of the medical detox staff.
Addiction counselor DeValle Williams calls a treatment center trying to find a place for one of his opioid-addicted clients at the nurses station at Saint Anthony Hospital in Chicago. Long before President Donald Trump declared the opioid crisis a national public health emergency, Williams and his team were fighting in the trenches where it’s tough to tell victory from defeat on any given day.
Albert Nunley, right, smokes a cigarette and talks with Robert Anderson, an addiction counselor at the Saint Anthony Hospital medical detox unit shortly before his van ride to a methadone clinic in Chicago. “I’m going to walk that straight line,” he declared as the van pulled up In front of the 119 year-old hospital.

‘Take all their excuses away’: Hard cases in heroin fight

Richard Rivera lies in his Saint Anthony Hospital bed a few days after arriving sick from heroin withdrawal in Chicago. His public health insurance would cover three days in the hospital’s new medical detox unit. Hours later, just moments from going to a sober-living facility, Rivera complained of chest pains that took him away from the watchful eye of the medical detox staff.
Albert Nunley walks to a methadone clinic after his three days with addiction counselors at the Saint Anthony Hospital medical detox unit in Chicago. Nunley had goals, small ones: “I done took my first step. Now I want to stay focused on doing the things I got to do. Going to AA meetings and things like that.”
Albert Nunley takes his methadone dose at the Saint Anthony Hospital medical detox unit in Chicago. Nunley told a counselor he’d been using heroin for nearly 40 years. With a friend recently dying of an overdose, his doctor telling him to quit, and feeling guilty around his grandchildren, Nunley says he is highly motivated to quit. “I don’t want to die from drugs,” he told the counselor.
Addiction counselor DeValle Williams listens to a conversation on opioid addiction at the nurses station at Saint Anthony Hospital in Chicago. Long before President Donald Trump declared the opioid crisis a national public health emergency, Williams and his team were fighting in the trenches where it’s tough to tell victory from defeat on any given day.
Albert Nunley responds to questions from Robert Anderson, an addiction counselor at the Saint Anthony Hospital medical detox unit in Chicago. Nunley told Anderson he’d been using heroin for nearly 40 years. The fentanyl now lacing the heroin on the streets was scaring him. With a friend recently dying of an overdose, his doctor telling him to quit, and feeling guilty around his grandchildren, Nunley says he is highly motivated to quit. “I don’t want to die from drugs,” he told Anderson.
Richard Rivera, still in his Saint Anthony Hospital gown, pleads with Robert Anderson, a member of the medical detox team, to get him into a sober-living facility near his family in Chicago. Hours later, just moments from going to a facility, Rivera complained of chest pains that took him away from the watchful eye of the medical detox staff.
Richard Rivera, still in his Saint Anthony Hospital gown, pleads with a member of the medical detox team to get him into a sober-living facility near his family in Chicago. His public health insurance would cover three days in the hospital’s new medical detox unit. Hours later, just moments from going to a facility, Rivera complained of chest pains that took him away from the watchful eye of the medical detox staff.
Addiction counselor DeValle Williams calls a treatment center trying to find a place for one of his opioid-addicted clients at the nurses station at Saint Anthony Hospital in Chicago. Long before President Donald Trump declared the opioid crisis a national public health emergency, Williams and his team were fighting in the trenches where it’s tough to tell victory from defeat on any given day.
Albert Nunley, right, smokes a cigarette and talks with Robert Anderson, an addiction counselor at the Saint Anthony Hospital medical detox unit shortly before his van ride to a methadone clinic in Chicago. “I’m going to walk that straight line,” he declared as the van pulled up In front of the 119 year-old hospital.
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