New Mexico ranchers, environmental groups work to improve public lands

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New Mexico ranchers, environmental groups work to improve public lands

A newfound ‘spirit of cooperation’ in the Jemez Mountains
Mike Lucero, left, and his cousin Orlando Lucero stand in a meadow along the Rio Cebolla in the Santa Fe National Forest in New Mexico. Ranchers are collaborating with groups like Trout Unlimited and the U.S. Forest Service to find ways to get water to their cattle, while also improving environmental conditions in the Jemez Mountains.
Cows cross a side channel of the Rio Cebolla in the Jemez Mountains in New Mexico before areas were fenced off to protect the habitat of the endangered New Mexico meadow jumping mouse.
A well drilled along side the Rio San Antonio will supply water for cattle grazing in the Jemez Mountains. Ranchers are collaborating with groups like Trout Unlimited and the U.S. Forest Service to find ways to get water to their cattle, while also improving environmental conditions in the Jemez Mountains.
A fence put up by the U.S. Forest Service to keep cattle away from the Rio Cebolla in the Jemez Mountains and protect the area for the New Mexico meadow jumping mouse. A few years ago, ranchers in northern New Mexico were in a contentious dispute with environmental groups and the U.S. Forest Service over access to grazing land in the Jemez Mountains, all because of a tiny mouse.

New Mexico ranchers, environmental groups work to improve public lands

Mike Lucero, left, and his cousin Orlando Lucero stand in a meadow along the Rio Cebolla in the Santa Fe National Forest in New Mexico. Ranchers are collaborating with groups like Trout Unlimited and the U.S. Forest Service to find ways to get water to their cattle, while also improving environmental conditions in the Jemez Mountains.
Cows cross a side channel of the Rio Cebolla in the Jemez Mountains in New Mexico before areas were fenced off to protect the habitat of the endangered New Mexico meadow jumping mouse.
A well drilled along side the Rio San Antonio will supply water for cattle grazing in the Jemez Mountains. Ranchers are collaborating with groups like Trout Unlimited and the U.S. Forest Service to find ways to get water to their cattle, while also improving environmental conditions in the Jemez Mountains.
A fence put up by the U.S. Forest Service to keep cattle away from the Rio Cebolla in the Jemez Mountains and protect the area for the New Mexico meadow jumping mouse. A few years ago, ranchers in northern New Mexico were in a contentious dispute with environmental groups and the U.S. Forest Service over access to grazing land in the Jemez Mountains, all because of a tiny mouse.
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