What will it take to get Superfund status in Silverton?

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What will it take to get Superfund status in Silverton?

After Gold King Mine disaster, many Silverton residents still oppose it because of ‘stigma’

Silverton Opposition

What will it take to get Superfund status in Silverton?

Wastewater continued to stream out of the Gold King Mine on Tuesday near Silverton, several days after a rush of 3 million gallons of it flooded Cement Creek and the Animas River. At the top of the photo is the mine’s opening, where an Environmental Protection Agency cleanup team was working with heavy machinery Aug. 5 and hit an earthen wall that had millions of gallons of water built up behind it.
Cement Creek water from the Gold King Mine area flows into the Animas River on Thursday in Silverton. The mine hasn’t been in operation since 1923, but it continues to leak metal-laced wastewater at several hundred gallons per minute.
Many visitors and residents in Silverton remain concerned about the effects of the sediment from Gold King Mine blowout above Silverton that sent a plume of contaminated water down the Animas River. A photographer’s hand casts a shadow on what is known as “yellow boy” – dried on the banks of the Animas River in Silverton below the confluence of Cement Creek.
Silverton is a mining-turned-tourist town in the craggy San Juan Mountains. It sits within the Silverton Caldera and is surrounded by hundreds of abandoned mines. Many people outside of Silverton have thought that the town and its residents should embrace a Superfund designation to help clean up the series of defunct mines that have been polluting the Animas for more than two decades. But even after the Gold King Mine accident Aug. 5, most Silverton residents resist the idea of being a Superfund site.
Beverly Rich, chairwoman of the San Juan Historical Society, speaks about the implications a Superfund designation could have on the area, saying many locals oppose Superfund because of their fealty to the mining industry.
DeAnne Gallegos, executive director of the Silverton Chamber of Commerce, speaks about the influx of media to the town in the aftermath of the Gold King Mine drainage and how the town’s image has taken a battering in the national press.
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