Taliesin West: A magnet for fans of architect Frank Lloyd Wright

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Taliesin West: A magnet for fans of architect Frank Lloyd Wright

Taliesin West in Scottsdale, Ariz., served as the winter home of architect Frank Lloyd Wright. Built on the desert’s hard floor, Wright built the structure with redwood beams and large rocks embedded in concrete. The buildings initially were covered with translucent canvas to let light in, but were later replaced with more durable plastic because of the sun’s brutal rays. Windows were large openings without glass.
A welcome sign at Taliesin West, in Scottsdale, Ariz., the winter desert home where Frank Lloyd Wright lived and worked from 1937 until his death in 1959 at age 91. Taliesin West was also the winter home of the architecture school he founded, and his students built the shelters where they slept in the surrounding desert. The site serves as a magnet for the architect’s fans and Wright Foundation officials say visits have been up considerably this year, the 150th anniversary of his birth, June 8, 1867.
A tunnel typical of the construction at Taliesin West in Scottsdale, Ariz., the winter home of architect Frank Lloyd Wright. At the National Historic Landmark, the buildings are connected by a series of walkways and terraces with dramatic views of the desert all around.
The “music pavilion,” a multipurpose room at Taliesin West in Scottsdale, Ariz., the winter home of architect Frank Lloyd Wright. Today, the only way to get a close look at Wright’s organic architecture uniting art and nature in Arizona’s Sonoran desert is through one of several guided tours. Wright Foundation officials say visits appear to be up significantly as the architect’s admirers mark the 150th anniversary of his birth, June 8, 1867.
Taliesin West in Scottsdale, Ariz., was the winter home of architect Frank Lloyd Wright from 1937 to 1959. Today, the site is a magnet for fans of the man who designed some of the most innovative buildings in America, attracting more than 100,000 visitors each year to this National Historic Landmark.
The words “Taliesin West” are carved into a rock wall with the desert landscape visible in the background in Scottsdale, Ariz. The complex served as the winter home of architect Frank Lloyd Wright in Scottsdale, Arizona from 1937 until his death in 1959 at age 91. The original Taliesin, Wright’s primary home in southwestern Wisconsin, where he was born, was named after a sixth century Welsh bard whose name means “shining brow.”
Many of Frank Lloyd Wright’s famous buildings were designed in this drafting room at Taliesin West in Scottsdale, Ariz., the winter home of the architect and the architecture school he founded. Many of Wright’s famous buildings were designed in this room, including the Guggenheim Museum in New York. Wright’s students also mapped out their own creations on the sloping desks that look out at the desert through broad windows.
If you go

TALIESIN WEST: 12621 N. Frank Lloyd Wright Blvd. (for GPS, 12345 N. Taliesin Drive), Scottsdale, Arizona; http://franklloydwright.org/taliesin-west/ or (480) 860-2700. Open daily September-May except Thanksgiving, Christmas, Easter. In June, July and August, closed Tuesday-Wednesday. The Insights Tour offered throughout the day beginning at 9 a.m., $36. Website lists various other tours, schedules and prices. Tours sell out so book ahead.

Taliesin West: A magnet for fans of architect Frank Lloyd Wright

Taliesin West in Scottsdale, Ariz., served as the winter home of architect Frank Lloyd Wright. Built on the desert’s hard floor, Wright built the structure with redwood beams and large rocks embedded in concrete. The buildings initially were covered with translucent canvas to let light in, but were later replaced with more durable plastic because of the sun’s brutal rays. Windows were large openings without glass.
A welcome sign at Taliesin West, in Scottsdale, Ariz., the winter desert home where Frank Lloyd Wright lived and worked from 1937 until his death in 1959 at age 91. Taliesin West was also the winter home of the architecture school he founded, and his students built the shelters where they slept in the surrounding desert. The site serves as a magnet for the architect’s fans and Wright Foundation officials say visits have been up considerably this year, the 150th anniversary of his birth, June 8, 1867.
A tunnel typical of the construction at Taliesin West in Scottsdale, Ariz., the winter home of architect Frank Lloyd Wright. At the National Historic Landmark, the buildings are connected by a series of walkways and terraces with dramatic views of the desert all around.
The “music pavilion,” a multipurpose room at Taliesin West in Scottsdale, Ariz., the winter home of architect Frank Lloyd Wright. Today, the only way to get a close look at Wright’s organic architecture uniting art and nature in Arizona’s Sonoran desert is through one of several guided tours. Wright Foundation officials say visits appear to be up significantly as the architect’s admirers mark the 150th anniversary of his birth, June 8, 1867.
Taliesin West in Scottsdale, Ariz., was the winter home of architect Frank Lloyd Wright from 1937 to 1959. Today, the site is a magnet for fans of the man who designed some of the most innovative buildings in America, attracting more than 100,000 visitors each year to this National Historic Landmark.
The words “Taliesin West” are carved into a rock wall with the desert landscape visible in the background in Scottsdale, Ariz. The complex served as the winter home of architect Frank Lloyd Wright in Scottsdale, Arizona from 1937 until his death in 1959 at age 91. The original Taliesin, Wright’s primary home in southwestern Wisconsin, where he was born, was named after a sixth century Welsh bard whose name means “shining brow.”
Many of Frank Lloyd Wright’s famous buildings were designed in this drafting room at Taliesin West in Scottsdale, Ariz., the winter home of the architect and the architecture school he founded. Many of Wright’s famous buildings were designed in this room, including the Guggenheim Museum in New York. Wright’s students also mapped out their own creations on the sloping desks that look out at the desert through broad windows.