Hard history: Mississippi museums explore slavery, Klan era

Southwest Life

Hard history: Mississippi museums explore slavery, Klan era

Ellie Dahmer, foreground, wife of Vernon Dahmer of Hattiesburg, who was killed in 1966 by the Ku Klux Klan, their daughter Bettie Dahmer, and an older brother Harold, right, view some of the artifacts in the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum during a private preview in Jackson, Miss. Dahmer was targeted because he encouraged fellow African-Americans to register to vote during the Jim Crow era. The facility is adjacent to the newly built Museum of Mississippi History, that documents the state’s rich history and the diversity of its people. Work crews and archivists are putting the final touches on the two museums that opened Dec. 9..
Media and invited guests were able to get a “sneak peak” into the state’s two new history museums, the Museum of Mississippi History, seen, and the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum, in Jackson, Miss. Work crews and archivists are putting the final touches on the two museums that opened Dec. 9.
A burned cross, a Klan robe and hand bills announcing Klan meetings are among the artifacts that are on display in the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum in Jackson, Miss. This facility is adjacent to the newly built Museum of Mississippi History, that documents the state’s rich history and the diversity of its people. Work crews and archivists are putting the final touches on the two museums that opened Dec. 9.
A monolith listing the names, dates and rationale for the lynching of African-American residents rests in the foreground of a photograph of a burning Ku Klux Klan cross on display in the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum in Jackson, Miss. The monolith is one of several that line this gallery with the documented lynchings. Room has been left for updating as needed. This facility is adjacent to the newly built Museum of Mississippi History, that documents the state’s rich history and the diversity of its people. Work crews and archivists are putting the final touches on the two museums that opened Dec. 9.
Booking photographs of Freedom Riders, stories and images of civil rights activists attempting to register and organize African Americans in the state, mix with a re-created jail cell and police paddy wagon in “A Tremor in the Iceberg,” gallery that also features a number of interactive electronic exhibits in the Jackson, Miss., museum. This facility is adjacent to the newly built Museum of Mississippi History, that documents the state’s rich history and the diversity of its people. Work crews and archivists are putting the final touches on the two museums that opened Dec. 9.
An interactive electronic exhibit and the mixed media collage highlight the struggle of James Meredith, an African-American veteran to enroll and attend the then all-white University of Mississippi in the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum, in Jackson, Miss. This facility is adjacent to the newly built Museum of Mississippi History, that documents the state’s rich history and the diversity of its people. Work crews and archivists are putting the final touches on the two museums that opened Dec. 9.
The story of the three civil rights workers who were kidnapped, murdered and had their bodies hidden by the Ku Klux Klan, is told as is the establishing of the the state funded Sovereignty Commission, an agency that spied on its citizens in the “I Question America,” gallery in the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum in Jackson, Miss., museum. This facility is adjacent to the newly built Museum of Mississippi History, that documents the state’s rich history and the diversity of its people. Work crews and archivists are putting the final touches on the two museums that opened Dec. 9.
A completed exhibit highlighting the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians is ready for viewing in the Museum of Mississippi History in Jackson, Miss. This facility, adjacent to the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum, documents the state’s rich history and its diversity. Work crews and archivists are putting the final touches on the two museums that opened Dec. 9.
A group portrait of the “Tougaloo Nine,” a group of Tougaloo College students who participated in a “read-in” at the “white-only” Jackson Municipal Library in 1961, rests below their Jackson Police Department booking photographs in the “A Tremor in the Iceberg,” gallery that also features a number of interactive electronic exhibits in the Jackson, Miss., museum. This facility is adjacent to the newly built Museum of Mississippi History, that documents the state’s rich history and the diversity of its people. Work crews and archivists are putting the final touches on the two museums that opened Dec. 9.
Work crews and archivists are putting the final touches to “This Little Light of Mine,” gallery, a soaring space in the heart of the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum, in Jackson, Miss., that is filled with natural light from large windows. Civil rights activists are honored with words and images, and the music of the movement emanates from a interactive dramatic light sculpture. This facility is adjacent to the newly built Museum of Mississippi History, that documents the state’s rich history and its diversity. Work crews and archivists are putting the final touches on the two museums that opened Dec. 9.

Hard history: Mississippi museums explore slavery, Klan era

Ellie Dahmer, foreground, wife of Vernon Dahmer of Hattiesburg, who was killed in 1966 by the Ku Klux Klan, their daughter Bettie Dahmer, and an older brother Harold, right, view some of the artifacts in the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum during a private preview in Jackson, Miss. Dahmer was targeted because he encouraged fellow African-Americans to register to vote during the Jim Crow era. The facility is adjacent to the newly built Museum of Mississippi History, that documents the state’s rich history and the diversity of its people. Work crews and archivists are putting the final touches on the two museums that opened Dec. 9..
Media and invited guests were able to get a “sneak peak” into the state’s two new history museums, the Museum of Mississippi History, seen, and the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum, in Jackson, Miss. Work crews and archivists are putting the final touches on the two museums that opened Dec. 9.
A burned cross, a Klan robe and hand bills announcing Klan meetings are among the artifacts that are on display in the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum in Jackson, Miss. This facility is adjacent to the newly built Museum of Mississippi History, that documents the state’s rich history and the diversity of its people. Work crews and archivists are putting the final touches on the two museums that opened Dec. 9.
A monolith listing the names, dates and rationale for the lynching of African-American residents rests in the foreground of a photograph of a burning Ku Klux Klan cross on display in the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum in Jackson, Miss. The monolith is one of several that line this gallery with the documented lynchings. Room has been left for updating as needed. This facility is adjacent to the newly built Museum of Mississippi History, that documents the state’s rich history and the diversity of its people. Work crews and archivists are putting the final touches on the two museums that opened Dec. 9.
Booking photographs of Freedom Riders, stories and images of civil rights activists attempting to register and organize African Americans in the state, mix with a re-created jail cell and police paddy wagon in “A Tremor in the Iceberg,” gallery that also features a number of interactive electronic exhibits in the Jackson, Miss., museum. This facility is adjacent to the newly built Museum of Mississippi History, that documents the state’s rich history and the diversity of its people. Work crews and archivists are putting the final touches on the two museums that opened Dec. 9.
An interactive electronic exhibit and the mixed media collage highlight the struggle of James Meredith, an African-American veteran to enroll and attend the then all-white University of Mississippi in the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum, in Jackson, Miss. This facility is adjacent to the newly built Museum of Mississippi History, that documents the state’s rich history and the diversity of its people. Work crews and archivists are putting the final touches on the two museums that opened Dec. 9.
The story of the three civil rights workers who were kidnapped, murdered and had their bodies hidden by the Ku Klux Klan, is told as is the establishing of the the state funded Sovereignty Commission, an agency that spied on its citizens in the “I Question America,” gallery in the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum in Jackson, Miss., museum. This facility is adjacent to the newly built Museum of Mississippi History, that documents the state’s rich history and the diversity of its people. Work crews and archivists are putting the final touches on the two museums that opened Dec. 9.
A completed exhibit highlighting the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians is ready for viewing in the Museum of Mississippi History in Jackson, Miss. This facility, adjacent to the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum, documents the state’s rich history and its diversity. Work crews and archivists are putting the final touches on the two museums that opened Dec. 9.
A group portrait of the “Tougaloo Nine,” a group of Tougaloo College students who participated in a “read-in” at the “white-only” Jackson Municipal Library in 1961, rests below their Jackson Police Department booking photographs in the “A Tremor in the Iceberg,” gallery that also features a number of interactive electronic exhibits in the Jackson, Miss., museum. This facility is adjacent to the newly built Museum of Mississippi History, that documents the state’s rich history and the diversity of its people. Work crews and archivists are putting the final touches on the two museums that opened Dec. 9.
Work crews and archivists are putting the final touches to “This Little Light of Mine,” gallery, a soaring space in the heart of the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum, in Jackson, Miss., that is filled with natural light from large windows. Civil rights activists are honored with words and images, and the music of the movement emanates from a interactive dramatic light sculpture. This facility is adjacent to the newly built Museum of Mississippi History, that documents the state’s rich history and its diversity. Work crews and archivists are putting the final touches on the two museums that opened Dec. 9.
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