‘Overtourism’ disrupts life in Amsterdam, and the Dutch capital pushes back

Southwest Life

‘Overtourism’ disrupts life in Amsterdam, and the Dutch capital pushes back

Graffiti reading “Go Home” is sprayed on a map of bicycle paths at the entrance to Amsterdam’s Vondelpark, a popular spot for tourists to ride their rental bicycles. “If the only reason for you to visit Amsterdam is to get loaded, to get stoned out of your mind, look, we can’t hold you back from coming, but we don’t want you here,” city Alderman Udo Kock said in a recent interview.
People walk through a narrow alley in the red-light district in Amsterdam, Netherlands. Every weekend, the heart of the historic port city, with its strip joints, seedy bars and scantily-clad prostitutes flaunting themselves behind plate glass windows, is overrun by foreign visitors over for stag and hen nights or to smoke marijuana in one of the city’s many “coffee shops.”
A salesperson dressed as a Dutch cheese girl helps a tourist in a cheese shop in Amsterdam, Netherlands. Hordes of tourists are derailing daily life in parts of historic Amsterdam as visitors clog the city’s narrow streets and alleys and stores catering only to tourists edge out shops for locals.
Canal cruise boats pass St. Nicholas Basilica in the center of Amsterdam, Netherlands. The Dutch capital, with its World Heritage-listed canals, its narrow streets of and the web of alleys in its red-light district, is now pushing back hard in an attempt to keep the city attractive to visitors and residents alike.
Tourists leave in a cheese shop Amsterdam, Netherlands. Hordes of tourists are derailing daily life in parts of historic Amsterdam as visitors clog the city’s narrow streets and alleys and stores catering only to tourists edge out shops for locals.
Tourists look at souvenirs in Amsterdam, Netherlands. According to figures published by Amsterdam, overnight stays in the city’s hotels rose from just over 8 million in 2006 to 14 million in 2016.
A canal cruise boat passes under an art work, part of the sixth edition of the Amsterdam Light Festival. The Dutch capital, with a Disneyland-like feel to it and its World Heritage-listed canals, is pushing back hard in an attempt to keep the city attractive to visitors and residents alike.
Spanish-speaking tourists on rental bicycles arrive as others line up, rear, to enter the Anne Frank House, left, in Amsterdam. A record 1,295,585 people visited the Anne Frank House last year, the seventh consecutive year the popular museum broke its visitor record.
Amsterdam’s De Waag, or Weigh House, is illuminated. Hordes of tourists are derailing daily life in parts of historic Amsterdam as visitors clog the city’s narrow streets and alleys and stores catering only to tourists edge out shops for locals.
Tourists pose for pictures with the “I Amsterdam” sign outside the Rijksmuseum, rear left, in Amsterdam, Netherlands.
Amsterdam’s Zuiderkerk, or South Church, is illuminated in Amsterdam, Netherlands. Hordes of tourists are derailing daily life in parts of historic Amsterdam as visitors clog the city’s narrow streets and alleys and stores catering only to tourists edge out shops for locals.

‘Overtourism’ disrupts life in Amsterdam, and the Dutch capital pushes back

Graffiti reading “Go Home” is sprayed on a map of bicycle paths at the entrance to Amsterdam’s Vondelpark, a popular spot for tourists to ride their rental bicycles. “If the only reason for you to visit Amsterdam is to get loaded, to get stoned out of your mind, look, we can’t hold you back from coming, but we don’t want you here,” city Alderman Udo Kock said in a recent interview.
People walk through a narrow alley in the red-light district in Amsterdam, Netherlands. Every weekend, the heart of the historic port city, with its strip joints, seedy bars and scantily-clad prostitutes flaunting themselves behind plate glass windows, is overrun by foreign visitors over for stag and hen nights or to smoke marijuana in one of the city’s many “coffee shops.”
A salesperson dressed as a Dutch cheese girl helps a tourist in a cheese shop in Amsterdam, Netherlands. Hordes of tourists are derailing daily life in parts of historic Amsterdam as visitors clog the city’s narrow streets and alleys and stores catering only to tourists edge out shops for locals.
Canal cruise boats pass St. Nicholas Basilica in the center of Amsterdam, Netherlands. The Dutch capital, with its World Heritage-listed canals, its narrow streets of and the web of alleys in its red-light district, is now pushing back hard in an attempt to keep the city attractive to visitors and residents alike.
Tourists leave in a cheese shop Amsterdam, Netherlands. Hordes of tourists are derailing daily life in parts of historic Amsterdam as visitors clog the city’s narrow streets and alleys and stores catering only to tourists edge out shops for locals.
Tourists look at souvenirs in Amsterdam, Netherlands. According to figures published by Amsterdam, overnight stays in the city’s hotels rose from just over 8 million in 2006 to 14 million in 2016.
A canal cruise boat passes under an art work, part of the sixth edition of the Amsterdam Light Festival. The Dutch capital, with a Disneyland-like feel to it and its World Heritage-listed canals, is pushing back hard in an attempt to keep the city attractive to visitors and residents alike.
Spanish-speaking tourists on rental bicycles arrive as others line up, rear, to enter the Anne Frank House, left, in Amsterdam. A record 1,295,585 people visited the Anne Frank House last year, the seventh consecutive year the popular museum broke its visitor record.
Amsterdam’s De Waag, or Weigh House, is illuminated. Hordes of tourists are derailing daily life in parts of historic Amsterdam as visitors clog the city’s narrow streets and alleys and stores catering only to tourists edge out shops for locals.
Tourists pose for pictures with the “I Amsterdam” sign outside the Rijksmuseum, rear left, in Amsterdam, Netherlands.
Amsterdam’s Zuiderkerk, or South Church, is illuminated in Amsterdam, Netherlands. Hordes of tourists are derailing daily life in parts of historic Amsterdam as visitors clog the city’s narrow streets and alleys and stores catering only to tourists edge out shops for locals.

‘Overtourism’ disrupts life in Amsterdam, and the Dutch capital pushes back

Tourists line up to enter the Anne Frank House in Amsterdam, Netherlands. According to figures published by Amsterdam, overnight stays in the city’s hotels rose from just over 8 million in 2006 to 14 million in 2016. A record 1,295,585 people visited the Anne Frank House last year, the seventh consecutive year the popular museum broke its visitor record.
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