Opioid crisis strains foster system as kids pried from homes

Southwest Life

Opioid crisis strains foster system as kids pried from homes

Shawnee Wilson holds her son, Kingston, in her apartment in Indianapolis. Kingston was born in 2016, and it took a month for doctors to wean him off the heroin Wilson exposed him to. He is in foster care now in Indianapolis, and Wilson is fighting to get him back.
Shawnee Wilson plays with her son, Kingston, in her apartment in Indianapolis. Wilson knows how those who don’t struggle with addiction view her, and said it’s hard to explain what compels people to keep using even when it can cost them their children. When she’s been high, she said, “I can’t see the consequences, because all I want is to feel that drug. I want that numbness.”
Shawnee Wilson watches as her son, Kingston, plays in her apartment in Indianapolis, on Tuesday, Aug. 8, 2017. Despite some relapses, she’s been clean several months and is convinced she’ll be able to keep it up. The clock is ticking. Federal law dictates the loss of parental rights for those whose children have been in foster care for 15 out of the previous 22 months.
Shawnee Wilson knows how those who don’t struggle with addiction view her, and said it’s hard to explain what compels people to keep using even when it can cost them their children. When she’s been high, she said, “I can’t see the consequences, because all I want is to feel that drug. I want that numbness.”

Opioid crisis strains foster system as kids pried from homes

Shawnee Wilson holds her son, Kingston, in her apartment in Indianapolis. Kingston was born in 2016, and it took a month for doctors to wean him off the heroin Wilson exposed him to. He is in foster care now in Indianapolis, and Wilson is fighting to get him back.
Shawnee Wilson plays with her son, Kingston, in her apartment in Indianapolis. Wilson knows how those who don’t struggle with addiction view her, and said it’s hard to explain what compels people to keep using even when it can cost them their children. When she’s been high, she said, “I can’t see the consequences, because all I want is to feel that drug. I want that numbness.”
Shawnee Wilson watches as her son, Kingston, plays in her apartment in Indianapolis, on Tuesday, Aug. 8, 2017. Despite some relapses, she’s been clean several months and is convinced she’ll be able to keep it up. The clock is ticking. Federal law dictates the loss of parental rights for those whose children have been in foster care for 15 out of the previous 22 months.
Shawnee Wilson knows how those who don’t struggle with addiction view her, and said it’s hard to explain what compels people to keep using even when it can cost them their children. When she’s been high, she said, “I can’t see the consequences, because all I want is to feel that drug. I want that numbness.”
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