Controversy over wildlife tourism and selfies in the Amazon

Southwest Life

Controversy over wildlife tourism and selfies in the Amazon

Tourists touch the shell of a large turtle seen during a forest walk in the Amazon rain forest outside of Manaus, Brazil. Many guides are keen on helping tourists get photos of animals in the Amazon.
An indigenous woman in the Amazon River community of Puerto Alegria, Peru, presenting a sloth for petting and photos with visiting tourists. A recent report by World Animal Protection along with an investigation by National Geographic contends that animals are harmed by these encounters with tourists who hold them and take selfies with them.
A guide shows young tourists a caiman that he plucked from the banks of a tributary of the Rio Negro outside of Manaus, Brazil. Seeing and touching caimans of all sizes is one of the most common activities for tourists at night, when the animals come out.
On the Net

AP Travel’s GET OUTTA HERE! podcast about visiting the Amazon and the wildlife controversy: http://bit.ly/2lcZbVm.Read more about traveling to the Amazon in this AP Travel story: http://bit.ly/2pF2AkW.

Controversy over wildlife tourism and selfies in the Amazon

Tourists touch the shell of a large turtle seen during a forest walk in the Amazon rain forest outside of Manaus, Brazil. Many guides are keen on helping tourists get photos of animals in the Amazon.
An indigenous woman in the Amazon River community of Puerto Alegria, Peru, presenting a sloth for petting and photos with visiting tourists. A recent report by World Animal Protection along with an investigation by National Geographic contends that animals are harmed by these encounters with tourists who hold them and take selfies with them.
A guide shows young tourists a caiman that he plucked from the banks of a tributary of the Rio Negro outside of Manaus, Brazil. Seeing and touching caimans of all sizes is one of the most common activities for tourists at night, when the animals come out.

Controversy over wildlife tourism and selfies in the Amazon

Young tourists look on as a man feeds fish to pink dolphins in the Rio Negro outside of Manaus, Brazil. Dolphins are one of the Amazon’s biggest attractions, and in recent years authorities have increased restrictions in how tourists can interact with them.

Controversy over wildlife tourism and selfies in the Amazon

A guide holds a piranha fish caught by a tourist outside of Manaus, Brazil. A favorite activity for tourists is catching fish, taking pictures with them, and then throwing them back.
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