Is Silverton ready for a cleanup?

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Is Silverton ready for a cleanup?

As mines continue to leach pollutants, some residents reconsider Superfund
While pristine snow Friday surrounds Cement Creek, the flowing water tells a different story. The creek still carries a toxic cocktail of minerals that flows from several mines northwest of Silverton.
The stream of heavy-metal pollutants gushing out of Silverton’s mines and into its waterways has grown so toxic that between 2005 and 2010, three out of the four trout species living in the Upper Animas River south of Silverton have disappeared.
“We all agree that it’s terribly important to protect the water and the environment,” Silverton resident William Dodge said. “But this isn’t just a Silverton issue. Silverton has clean water to drink – it’s the folks downstream, in Durango and in the Southern Ute Tribe – who are most outrightly affected by the mine drainage into the water.”

Is Silverton ready for a cleanup?

While pristine snow Friday surrounds Cement Creek, the flowing water tells a different story. The creek still carries a toxic cocktail of minerals that flows from several mines northwest of Silverton.
The stream of heavy-metal pollutants gushing out of Silverton’s mines and into its waterways has grown so toxic that between 2005 and 2010, three out of the four trout species living in the Upper Animas River south of Silverton have disappeared.
“We all agree that it’s terribly important to protect the water and the environment,” Silverton resident William Dodge said. “But this isn’t just a Silverton issue. Silverton has clean water to drink – it’s the folks downstream, in Durango and in the Southern Ute Tribe – who are most outrightly affected by the mine drainage into the water.”
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