History, beauty frame a new tourist economy in Appalachia’s coal country

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History, beauty frame a new tourist economy in Appalachia’s coal country

Rodney Embrey, an employee at nearby Buckingham coal mine, walks into the building he and a business partner purchased to start an antiques dealership in Corning, Ohio. Communities across Appalachia are turning increasingly to the region’s rich reserves in things other than coal, namely, history and rugged natural beauty, to frame a new tourist economy.
Corning, Ohio, native Susan Hern leans on the shop counter at her gift and craft shop, Anew View, as she speaks of her family’s history in long-past local oil industry and the need for residents to put effort into rekindling their town.
Sacramento natives Larry Monson, right, and his wife, Malana, embrace in their My Little Bakery & Coffee Shop opened less than two weeks earlier. Monson describes the shop as an effort to “put one more brick into the foundation for a better town, to bring some life back.”
A panorama showing the long-since disassembled oil derricks peppering the landscape of 1920’s New Straitsville is displayed as Tom Craig, a 20-year resident and member of the New Straitsville History Group, shows off models of derricks at the group’s museum in New Straitsville, Ohio.
Tom Craig, a 20-year resident and member of the New Straitsville History Group, stands among the recovered remains of the local barbershop, complete with original barber’s chairs and mirrors, at thee group’s museum in Ohio. Communities across Appalachia are turning increasingly to the region’s rich reserves in things other than coal, namely, history and rugged natural beauty, to frame a new tourist economy.
Tom Craig, a 20-year resident and member of the New Straitsville History Group, right, takes two AmeriCorps members on a tour of the Robertson Cave, a tourist attraction that was once home to clandestine meetings for early labor union organizers in the late 1800s in New Straitsville, Ohio.
Selina Nadeau, 22, an AmeriCorps member with Ohio’s Hill County Heritage Area group, tours the historic Tecumseh Theater, built in 1908 as the “Red Man’s Hall” and renamed in 1976 to honor a Shawnee Native American tribal leader. The theater, in Shawnee, Ohio, is now under renovation to serve the community.
Selina Nadeau, 22, an AmeriCorps member with Ohio’s Hill County Heritage Area group, left, and Sally Sugar, 23, of Columbus, an Ohio Stream Restore Corps AmeriCorps member, tour the historic Tecumseh Theater, built in 1908 as the “Red Man’s Hall” and renamed in 1976 to honor a Shawnee Native American tribal leader.
Customers dine at My Little Bakery & Coffee Shop, opened less than two weeks earlier by Sacremento transplants Larry and Malana Monson in Corning, Ohio.
Corning native Susan Hern, center, hands a holiday plant to Malana Monson, a local bakery owner, at her gift and craft shop, Anew View, in Corning, Ohio. Enjoying a drink, hike or overnight stay or in region infused with stories, sweat and strife is turning out to be a draw to aging baby boomers and millennials alike. Studies show these efforts are attracting tourists, new residents and a new sense of self-worth.
Selina Nadeau, 22, an AmeriCorps member with Ohio’s Hill County Heritage Area group, right, handles a customer transaction at the Winding Road Marketplace, a hub for selling the wares of local businesses in Shawnee, Ohio.
Sacramento native Larry Monson, center, stands in his new business, the My Little Bakery & Coffee Shop, after opening less than two weeks earlier. Monson describes his business as a way to “put one more brick into the foundation for a better town, to bring some life back” in Corning, Ohio.
Lumps of coal are sold as ornamental trinkets at the Winding Road Marketplace, a hub for selling the wares of local businesses in Shawnee, Ohio.
Tom Craig, a 20-year resident and member of the New Straitsville History Group, holds a panorama photograph showing the 1923 congregation while standing in the United Methodist Church in New Straitsville, Ohio.
Tom Craig, a 20-year resident and member of the New Straitsville History Group, demonstrates the church organ, partially donated by steel tycoon Andrew Carnegie, at the United Methodist Church where his wife plays the instrument in New Straitsville, Ohio.
Images depicting long-since disassembled oil derricks peppering the landscape of 1920s New Straitsville is displayed at the New Straitsville History Group Museum.
Framed collages showing the graduating classes of now-closed New Straitsville schools are displayed as Tom Craig, a 20-year resident and member of the New Straitsville History Group leads a tour at their Museum.

History, beauty frame a new tourist economy in Appalachia’s coal country

Rodney Embrey, an employee at nearby Buckingham coal mine, walks into the building he and a business partner purchased to start an antiques dealership in Corning, Ohio. Communities across Appalachia are turning increasingly to the region’s rich reserves in things other than coal, namely, history and rugged natural beauty, to frame a new tourist economy.
Corning, Ohio, native Susan Hern leans on the shop counter at her gift and craft shop, Anew View, as she speaks of her family’s history in long-past local oil industry and the need for residents to put effort into rekindling their town.
Sacramento natives Larry Monson, right, and his wife, Malana, embrace in their My Little Bakery & Coffee Shop opened less than two weeks earlier. Monson describes the shop as an effort to “put one more brick into the foundation for a better town, to bring some life back.”
A panorama showing the long-since disassembled oil derricks peppering the landscape of 1920’s New Straitsville is displayed as Tom Craig, a 20-year resident and member of the New Straitsville History Group, shows off models of derricks at the group’s museum in New Straitsville, Ohio.
Tom Craig, a 20-year resident and member of the New Straitsville History Group, stands among the recovered remains of the local barbershop, complete with original barber’s chairs and mirrors, at thee group’s museum in Ohio. Communities across Appalachia are turning increasingly to the region’s rich reserves in things other than coal, namely, history and rugged natural beauty, to frame a new tourist economy.
Tom Craig, a 20-year resident and member of the New Straitsville History Group, right, takes two AmeriCorps members on a tour of the Robertson Cave, a tourist attraction that was once home to clandestine meetings for early labor union organizers in the late 1800s in New Straitsville, Ohio.
Selina Nadeau, 22, an AmeriCorps member with Ohio’s Hill County Heritage Area group, tours the historic Tecumseh Theater, built in 1908 as the “Red Man’s Hall” and renamed in 1976 to honor a Shawnee Native American tribal leader. The theater, in Shawnee, Ohio, is now under renovation to serve the community.
Selina Nadeau, 22, an AmeriCorps member with Ohio’s Hill County Heritage Area group, left, and Sally Sugar, 23, of Columbus, an Ohio Stream Restore Corps AmeriCorps member, tour the historic Tecumseh Theater, built in 1908 as the “Red Man’s Hall” and renamed in 1976 to honor a Shawnee Native American tribal leader.
Customers dine at My Little Bakery & Coffee Shop, opened less than two weeks earlier by Sacremento transplants Larry and Malana Monson in Corning, Ohio.
Corning native Susan Hern, center, hands a holiday plant to Malana Monson, a local bakery owner, at her gift and craft shop, Anew View, in Corning, Ohio. Enjoying a drink, hike or overnight stay or in region infused with stories, sweat and strife is turning out to be a draw to aging baby boomers and millennials alike. Studies show these efforts are attracting tourists, new residents and a new sense of self-worth.
Selina Nadeau, 22, an AmeriCorps member with Ohio’s Hill County Heritage Area group, right, handles a customer transaction at the Winding Road Marketplace, a hub for selling the wares of local businesses in Shawnee, Ohio.
Sacramento native Larry Monson, center, stands in his new business, the My Little Bakery & Coffee Shop, after opening less than two weeks earlier. Monson describes his business as a way to “put one more brick into the foundation for a better town, to bring some life back” in Corning, Ohio.
Lumps of coal are sold as ornamental trinkets at the Winding Road Marketplace, a hub for selling the wares of local businesses in Shawnee, Ohio.
Tom Craig, a 20-year resident and member of the New Straitsville History Group, holds a panorama photograph showing the 1923 congregation while standing in the United Methodist Church in New Straitsville, Ohio.
Tom Craig, a 20-year resident and member of the New Straitsville History Group, demonstrates the church organ, partially donated by steel tycoon Andrew Carnegie, at the United Methodist Church where his wife plays the instrument in New Straitsville, Ohio.
Images depicting long-since disassembled oil derricks peppering the landscape of 1920s New Straitsville is displayed at the New Straitsville History Group Museum.
Framed collages showing the graduating classes of now-closed New Straitsville schools are displayed as Tom Craig, a 20-year resident and member of the New Straitsville History Group leads a tour at their Museum.

History, beauty frame a new tourist economy in Appalachia’s coal country

John Winnenberg is a local activist and proprietor of Winding Road Marketplace, a hub for selling the wares of local businesses in Shawnee, Ohio.

History, beauty frame a new tourist economy in Appalachia’s coal country

Sally Sugar, 23, an Ohio Stream Restore Corps AmeriCorps member, left, tours Tecumseh Lake, a 13-acre artificial lake constructed in 1952 to serve as a recreation area for residents. Sugar is alongside Selina Nadeau, 22, an AmeriCorps member with Ohio’s Hill County Heritage Area group in Shawnee, Ohio.

History, beauty frame a new tourist economy in Appalachia’s coal country

Rodney Embrey, an employee at nearby Buckingham coal mine, describes the process of renovating the building he and a business partner purchased to start an antiques dealership in Corning, Ohio. Communities across Appalachia are turning increasingly to the region’s rich reserves in things other than coal, namely, history and rugged natural beauty, to frame a new tourist economy.
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