A pollution solution – if the money turns up

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A pollution solution – if the money turns up

Limestone plant one fix, but players can’t agree on who will pay for it
In this series

Sunday: How serious the problem is and why it’s been so difficult to fix. Also, why Silverton has resisted federal money and the Superfund label that would come with it.
TODAY: Possible solutions and who might pay. Also, successes in cleaning up mines in the Mineral Creek drainage.
Tuesday: Silverton’s mining history lures tourists. Faced with a difficult environmental challenge, residents talk about bringing the industry back after a 22-year absence.

A pollution solution – if the money turns up

This area below the San Antonio Mine near Red Mountain Pass was remediated several years ago. Bill Simon, a co-coordinator of the Animas River Stakeholders Group, collects soil samples to see why some plants aren’t growing in certain areas. Congress Mine is behind him.
Bill Simon, a co-coordinator of the Animas River Stakeholders Group, analyzes soils and plants in a reclaimed area below the San Antonio Mine in the Mineral Creek drainage. He is trying to understand why plants are growing in some areas and not in others.
From left, Chris Peltz, scientist with Research Services, Kirsten Brown, with the Colorado Division of Reclamation, Mining and Safety, and Bill Simon, a co-coordinator of the Animas River Stakeholders Group, take soil samples below the Congress Mine near Red Mountain Pass. The area in the Mineral Creek drainage was reclaimed several years ago.
Contractors for the Environmental Protection Agency work to contain the flow of contaminated water into a single pipe that flows out of the Red and Bonita Mine north of Silverton. The water flow will be directed to sedimentation ponds. At far right is an iron fen that was killed because of the mine and a mill. The fen could be restored if it had quality water, according to Bill Simon.
From left, Chris Peltz, scientist with Research Services, Kirsten Brown, with the Colorado Division of Reclamation, Mining and Safety, and Bill Simon, a co-coordinator of the Animas River Stakeholders Group, work below the San Antonio Mine near Red Mountain Pass. The group was in the reclaimed area to collect soil and plant samples.
Bill Simon, a co-coordinator of the Animas River Stakeholders Group, analyzes soil made up of, from left, clay, peat, clay, and mineralized soil, in a reclaimed area below the San Antonio Mine in the Mineral Creek drainage. He is trying to understand why plants are growing in some areas and not in others.
Bill Simon, a co-coordinator of the Animas River Stakeholders Group, holds enargite (copper arsenic sulfide), which is toxic to plant growth.
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