Updating 19th century mining law proves hard as rock

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Updating 19th century mining law proves hard as rock

Proposed mining fee would help clean up abandoned sites, senators say
Workers cover the tailings pile of the Bullion King Mine near Red Mountain Pass outside of Silverton in August 2015. Efforts to reform the nation’s mining law that dates back to 1872 still face many obstacles in Congress.
Crews from Simbeck Liners of Bayfield in August 2015 spread a rubber lining to cover the tailings pile of the Bullion King Mine near Red Mountain Pass outside of Silverton. Leaking mines in the San Juan Mountains, including the Gold King Mine spill, have drawn attention to the lack of a fee charged to hard-rock mining firms that could be used to pay for cleanup of mines once operations cease.
In the summer of 2015, the Bullion Mine at 12,400 feet, northwest of Red Mountain, had waste relocated and buried away from any water flow. “1872 mining reform opens up this whole question of mining economics on federal lands, and that’s a very complex question where there are lots of factors,” said Steve Moyer, vice president for government affairs with the nonprofit Trout Unlimited.

Updating 19th century mining law proves hard as rock

Workers cover the tailings pile of the Bullion King Mine near Red Mountain Pass outside of Silverton in August 2015. Efforts to reform the nation’s mining law that dates back to 1872 still face many obstacles in Congress.
Crews from Simbeck Liners of Bayfield in August 2015 spread a rubber lining to cover the tailings pile of the Bullion King Mine near Red Mountain Pass outside of Silverton. Leaking mines in the San Juan Mountains, including the Gold King Mine spill, have drawn attention to the lack of a fee charged to hard-rock mining firms that could be used to pay for cleanup of mines once operations cease.
In the summer of 2015, the Bullion Mine at 12,400 feet, northwest of Red Mountain, had waste relocated and buried away from any water flow. “1872 mining reform opens up this whole question of mining economics on federal lands, and that’s a very complex question where there are lots of factors,” said Steve Moyer, vice president for government affairs with the nonprofit Trout Unlimited.
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