Some Korean foods may taste familiar during the Olympics

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Some Korean foods may taste familiar during the Olympics

Server Young Kim talks about the South Korean dish called budae jjigae, or “army stew,” he is serving simmering atop a heating plate at a Korean restaurant on Dec. 12 in Shoreline, Wash.
Korean-style fried chicken sits waiting to be eaten at a restaurant in Edmonds, Wash. Southern foods such as fried chicken and moon pie have made lasting impressions on the Korean diet, just as the U.S. military has historically included a large percentage of its recruits from the Southern U.S.
Budae jjigae, or “army stew,” simmers as it sits atop a heating plate at a Korean restaurant in Shoreline, Wash. The stew is a salty, savory concoction of spicy kimchi, ramen noodles and various processed meat products served bubbling hot.
The menu at a Korean restaurant in Shoreline, Wash. includes photos showing a neat arrangement of SPAM and other meats.

Some Korean foods may taste familiar during the Olympics

Server Young Kim talks about the South Korean dish called budae jjigae, or “army stew,” he is serving simmering atop a heating plate at a Korean restaurant on Dec. 12 in Shoreline, Wash.
Korean-style fried chicken sits waiting to be eaten at a restaurant in Edmonds, Wash. Southern foods such as fried chicken and moon pie have made lasting impressions on the Korean diet, just as the U.S. military has historically included a large percentage of its recruits from the Southern U.S.
Budae jjigae, or “army stew,” simmers as it sits atop a heating plate at a Korean restaurant in Shoreline, Wash. The stew is a salty, savory concoction of spicy kimchi, ramen noodles and various processed meat products served bubbling hot.
The menu at a Korean restaurant in Shoreline, Wash. includes photos showing a neat arrangement of SPAM and other meats.
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