Researchers identify West’s wildlife that can cope with climate change

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Researchers identify West’s wildlife that can cope with climate change

Researchers are identifying West’s wildlife that can best cope with climate change
Pikas spend summers collecting and fiercely defending “haypiles” of wild plants, their food source during the winter when they’re hunkered down in talus slope burrows.
While most pika populations are declining because of climate change, some aren’t. Behavioral plasticity may explain why – and offer hope for the species’ survival.

Researchers identify West’s wildlife that can cope with climate change

Pikas spend summers collecting and fiercely defending “haypiles” of wild plants, their food source during the winter when they’re hunkered down in talus slope burrows.
While most pika populations are declining because of climate change, some aren’t. Behavioral plasticity may explain why – and offer hope for the species’ survival.
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