Officials consider using robots to combat mine spills

Officials consider using robots to combat mine spills

A robot rolls through an underground mine at the Edgar Mine set of Denver on Dec. 13, 2017. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is considering robots and other technologies to investigate abandoned or inactive mines to learn what needs to be done with contaminated water spilling out of the mines and into rivers.
A miner is backed by a robot in the Edgar Mine near Denver on Dec. 13, 2017. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is considering robots and other technologies to investigate abandoned or inactive mines to learn what needs to be done with contaminated water spilling out of the mines and into rivers. Many of the mines are poorly understood and dangerous because of bad air and cave-ins.
Wastewater flows from a trough and down a steep ravine on Aug. 13, 2015, at the site of the blowout at the Gold King mine which triggered a major spill of toxic wastewater, outside Silverton. Crumbling mine tunnels awash with polluted waters perforate the Colorado mountains, and scientists may one day send robots creeping through the pitch-black passages to study the mysterious currents that sometimes burst to the surface with devastating effects.

Officials consider using robots to combat mine spills

A robot rolls through an underground mine at the Edgar Mine set of Denver on Dec. 13, 2017. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is considering robots and other technologies to investigate abandoned or inactive mines to learn what needs to be done with contaminated water spilling out of the mines and into rivers.
A miner is backed by a robot in the Edgar Mine near Denver on Dec. 13, 2017. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is considering robots and other technologies to investigate abandoned or inactive mines to learn what needs to be done with contaminated water spilling out of the mines and into rivers. Many of the mines are poorly understood and dangerous because of bad air and cave-ins.
Wastewater flows from a trough and down a steep ravine on Aug. 13, 2015, at the site of the blowout at the Gold King mine which triggered a major spill of toxic wastewater, outside Silverton. Crumbling mine tunnels awash with polluted waters perforate the Colorado mountains, and scientists may one day send robots creeping through the pitch-black passages to study the mysterious currents that sometimes burst to the surface with devastating effects.
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