Cubs orphaned after mother was euthanized returning to wild

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Cubs orphaned after mother was euthanized returning to wild

Wildlife officers Adam Gerstenberger, left, and Tim Kroening, with Colorado Parks and Wildlife, place a bear cub in an artificial den on Feb. 2 near Pikes Peak in Colorado Springs. Orphan bear triplets, banished from Colorado Springs’ Broadmoor neighborhood for eating human food, had spent seven months in rehabilitation pens before being returned to open wild space.
A bear cub looks out of its home on Jan. 31 at Wet Mountain Wet Mountain Wildlife Rehabilitation, a nonprofit animal rehabilitation operation in Wetmore. Orphan bear triplets, banished from Colorado Springs’ swank Broadmoor neighborhood for eating human food, have spent seven months in rehabilitation pens, savoring the wildlife equivalent of room service at a fancy hotel: benevolent caretakers twice a day delivering buckets of leafy greens, fruit and sometimes salmon.
Rod Sanchez, a volunteer, left, and Tim Kroening, a wildlife officers with Colorado Parks and Wildlife, pull a cub in a sled to be placed in artificial dens near Pikes Peak in Colorado Springs. Orphan bear triplets, banished from Colorado Springs’ swank Broadmoor neighborhood for eating human food, have spent seven months in rehabilitation pens, savoring the wildlife equivalent of room service at a fancy hotel: benevolent caretakers twice a day delivering buckets of leafy greens, fruit and sometimes salmon.
A cub is placed on a sled to be pulled by wildlife officers, with Colorado Parks and Wildlife, and placed in artificial dens near Pikes Peak on in Colorado Springs. Orphan bear triplets, banished from Colorado Springs’ swank Broadmoor neighborhood for eating human food, have spent seven months in rehabilitation pens, savoring the wildlife equivalent of room service at a fancy hotel: benevolent caretakers twice a day delivering buckets of leafy greens, fruit and sometimes salmon.

Cubs orphaned after mother was euthanized returning to wild

Wildlife officers Adam Gerstenberger, left, and Tim Kroening, with Colorado Parks and Wildlife, place a bear cub in an artificial den on Feb. 2 near Pikes Peak in Colorado Springs. Orphan bear triplets, banished from Colorado Springs’ Broadmoor neighborhood for eating human food, had spent seven months in rehabilitation pens before being returned to open wild space.
A bear cub looks out of its home on Jan. 31 at Wet Mountain Wet Mountain Wildlife Rehabilitation, a nonprofit animal rehabilitation operation in Wetmore. Orphan bear triplets, banished from Colorado Springs’ swank Broadmoor neighborhood for eating human food, have spent seven months in rehabilitation pens, savoring the wildlife equivalent of room service at a fancy hotel: benevolent caretakers twice a day delivering buckets of leafy greens, fruit and sometimes salmon.
Rod Sanchez, a volunteer, left, and Tim Kroening, a wildlife officers with Colorado Parks and Wildlife, pull a cub in a sled to be placed in artificial dens near Pikes Peak in Colorado Springs. Orphan bear triplets, banished from Colorado Springs’ swank Broadmoor neighborhood for eating human food, have spent seven months in rehabilitation pens, savoring the wildlife equivalent of room service at a fancy hotel: benevolent caretakers twice a day delivering buckets of leafy greens, fruit and sometimes salmon.
A cub is placed on a sled to be pulled by wildlife officers, with Colorado Parks and Wildlife, and placed in artificial dens near Pikes Peak on in Colorado Springs. Orphan bear triplets, banished from Colorado Springs’ swank Broadmoor neighborhood for eating human food, have spent seven months in rehabilitation pens, savoring the wildlife equivalent of room service at a fancy hotel: benevolent caretakers twice a day delivering buckets of leafy greens, fruit and sometimes salmon.
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