Beyond tent cities, Durango-area residents consider village for the homeless

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Beyond tent cities, Durango-area residents consider village for the homeless

Forum this weekend to explore transitional housing concepts
Fort Lewis College students from left, Ian Begay, Eli Dickinson, Andre Bos and Natalie Lyon construct a house with the frame made of plastic pipe and fittings. The engineering students are testing a house developed by Humanitarian House International, a Colorado-based nonprofit, and may design improvements. Some advocates think the homes could be built for Durango residents.
Fort Lewis College student Ian Begay works on a tiny house with the frame made of PVC pipe last month at the FLC before it is covered with wood and insulation. The students plan to test the structural integrity of the house originally designed by Humanitarian House International. The students will also identify alternative designs and options for providing units to the homes.
A tiny house designed by Humanitarian House International relies on PVC pipe framing. It’s meant to be constructed in a few days by someone who has no building experience.
Fort Lewis College student Eli Dickinson replaces a broken pipe in the frame of a tiny house. Tiny home villages for homeless people have been established in cities across the country.
If you go

A forum about ending homelessness will be held from 7:45 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Saturday at the La Plata County Fairgrounds Exhibit Hall, 2500 Main Ave. The event is free. Speakers will start at 8:30 a.m. after breakfast. Keynote speaker Don Burnes will start at 8:45 a.m. A hot meal for homeless residents will be served at 3:30 p.m. A full schedule can be found at communitycompassionoutreach.com or the forum’s EventBrite page.

Beyond tent cities, Durango-area residents consider village for the homeless

Fort Lewis College students from left, Ian Begay, Eli Dickinson, Andre Bos and Natalie Lyon construct a house with the frame made of plastic pipe and fittings. The engineering students are testing a house developed by Humanitarian House International, a Colorado-based nonprofit, and may design improvements. Some advocates think the homes could be built for Durango residents.
Fort Lewis College student Ian Begay works on a tiny house with the frame made of PVC pipe last month at the FLC before it is covered with wood and insulation. The students plan to test the structural integrity of the house originally designed by Humanitarian House International. The students will also identify alternative designs and options for providing units to the homes.
A tiny house designed by Humanitarian House International relies on PVC pipe framing. It’s meant to be constructed in a few days by someone who has no building experience.
Fort Lewis College student Eli Dickinson replaces a broken pipe in the frame of a tiny house. Tiny home villages for homeless people have been established in cities across the country.
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