From comfort to high-tech: Food a serious quest at Olympics

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From comfort to high-tech: Food a serious quest at Olympics

A woman cooks at a restaurant on Feb. 12 in Gangneung, South Korea. Korean food is some of the world’s finest – savory, salty soups with fish so tender it falls off the bone; thick slabs of grilled pork and beef backed with spicy kimchi that many Korean grandmothers swear cures the common cold. But it’s very different from what many foreign Olympians are used to.
United States figure skaters Adam Rippon, left, and Vincent Zhou pose for cameras after a press conference Feb. 13 at the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea. Zhou said he needs a lot of carbs, “before, between and after sessions,” to fend off fatigue. While Rippon said sheer abundance can be a danger for athletes.
A woman leaves a restaurant in Gangneung, South Korea.
United States figure skaters Vincent Zhou, left, and Adam Rippon answer questions during a press conference at the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea. Food is a big deal for Olympians. The U.S. team has its own chefs and dietitians, as well as two “nutrition centers” at the Winter Olympics. Zhou said he needs a lot of carbs, “before, between and after sessions,” to fend off fatigue. While Rippon said sheer abundance can be a danger for athletes.
A Korean family eats at a traditional restaurant in Jeongseon, South Korea. Korean food is some of the world’s finest – savory, salty soups with fish so tender it falls off the bone; thick slabs of grilled pork and beef backed with spicy kimchi that many Korean grandmothers swear cures the common cold. But it’s very different from what many foreign Olympians are used to.

From comfort to high-tech: Food a serious quest at Olympics

A woman cooks at a restaurant on Feb. 12 in Gangneung, South Korea. Korean food is some of the world’s finest – savory, salty soups with fish so tender it falls off the bone; thick slabs of grilled pork and beef backed with spicy kimchi that many Korean grandmothers swear cures the common cold. But it’s very different from what many foreign Olympians are used to.
United States figure skaters Adam Rippon, left, and Vincent Zhou pose for cameras after a press conference Feb. 13 at the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea. Zhou said he needs a lot of carbs, “before, between and after sessions,” to fend off fatigue. While Rippon said sheer abundance can be a danger for athletes.
A woman leaves a restaurant in Gangneung, South Korea.
United States figure skaters Vincent Zhou, left, and Adam Rippon answer questions during a press conference at the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea. Food is a big deal for Olympians. The U.S. team has its own chefs and dietitians, as well as two “nutrition centers” at the Winter Olympics. Zhou said he needs a lot of carbs, “before, between and after sessions,” to fend off fatigue. While Rippon said sheer abundance can be a danger for athletes.
A Korean family eats at a traditional restaurant in Jeongseon, South Korea. Korean food is some of the world’s finest – savory, salty soups with fish so tender it falls off the bone; thick slabs of grilled pork and beef backed with spicy kimchi that many Korean grandmothers swear cures the common cold. But it’s very different from what many foreign Olympians are used to.
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